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Tapestry

Graham Allen's Review Of Early Intervention


mundia
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I caught the end of a news report this morning. Now I think I know what it was about.

 

There was a comment about all pre-school children should be monitored for social and emotional development. I'll be interested to see what recommendations there are about how practitioners should go about intervening.

Edited by Upsy Daisy
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Guest rainyjaney

What's interesting about Telegraph readers comments is how many of them palm children off to private nurseries and have hardly any interaction with their own children. How dare they then be so judgmental about others.

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I dont think it will be available by hard copy, unless anyone knows different?

 

Its not a difficult read as there are large appendices at the back, and i read the recommendations first before deciding whether or not to read the whole chapter in detail.

 

My initial good points would be continuing to develop he workforce including; specialist CPD on emotional and social development; ensuring that equality of the foundation years (frank fields report also saying this) with primary and secondary; more money for foundation years; closer links between settings and health visitors.

 

My initial oh dear points..constant assessments and screening including 'school readiness' testing at 3 which could be 'national' tests; much of the research referred to is from the US (edited to add, not that there's anything wrong with international research per se, but I'm not sure how well it translates into another culture)

 

when you've had a read, do come backa dn share your first responses.

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The school readiness testing though seems to be focused on social and emotional indicators, and children we are not ready will be given support. I don't have a philosophical issue with this, as long as sensible standards and testiing methods are used.

 

For example, I knew my 3 year old was ready because she enjoyed meeting new people and havign friendships, she could focus on an activity, she was asking questions and being interested in the reply, she enjoyed mark-making, loved stories and songs, was interested in the world around her.

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Thank you so much for the link Mundia.

I sent the link across the lounge to my other half's office and he has kindly printed it for me(he has a snazzy laser printer whereas mine is a crank up the handle almost!)

 

I am not very far in 'at all' but initially dislike the phrase 'school readiness' too but perahps agree with someone who has already said that this relates to emotional and social development.

 

I watched a lengthy documentary last night on a nurture room at a school in Scotland and parts of it were quite heartbreaking - the little chap whose role play was staggering around the home corner because he was 'drunk' and eventually 'passing out' on the floor :o his play in the sand involved stabbing, killing and burying people xD The interview with mum was equally sad - some early intervention perhaps wouldn't have gone amiss for this family.

 

Don't know about anyone else but in recent years I have found a 'generation' of parents who simply do not know how to parent - they didn't perhaps have the best childhood themselves. What might be obvious or second nature to some of us as parents is seemingly not the case for many. Locally early intervention programmes of various sorts have had limited success because the very ones who would benefit are the ones who don't access what is available and 'hard to reach families' is a phrase often heard.

 

Sorry went off on a bit of a ramble there

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