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Next Steps Planning/goals


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Hi All,

 

I have been looking through several topics of discussion and reading about recording assessments and observations of children.

 

At the nursery I work, we have a sheet for observations with 6 boxes according to the area of development and then a sheet for goals to concentrate in future. I will try and attach a copy..

 

I am looking at new ways to record the goals to help parents understand where their child is at and contribute, does anyone have any other ways they use or possible ideas?

 

Thanks

 

Charly

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Each household is entitled to a copy of the EYFS. If you order one for each family to be sent to their address, then they will have a copy to refer to and maybe to make records of their child's develpment.

 

I also print out a copy for myself, the table format was put on here a few weeks ago, or you can check out my previous posts.

 

Honey

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Guest jenpercy
Each household is entitled to a copy of the EYFS. If you order one for each family to be sent to their address, then they will have a copy to refer to and maybe to make records of their child's develpment.

 

I also print out a copy for myself, the table format was put on here a few weeks ago, or you can check out my previous posts.

 

Honey

 

I don't think that the parents would thank you for a copy of the whole thing! I haven't read any more of it than I had to and that was under duress!! I am also puzzled how this would help them to make records of their children's progress as it does not actually contain anything parent friendly.

 

if you mean the table with children's aattainments for each stage, this would probably lead to confusion, as each setting needs to have a consensus on how to fill it in. I have seen variations between settings, all staffed by trained personnel.

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I see your point, and agree totally.

 

We have the general tracking sheet to record observations and assess progess, but I don't think this is particularly helpful to parents.

 

I was looking more to have a sheet purely for goals that we (as nursery staff) and parents feel the child should be able to attain at the level they are at. Observations of this would be recorded and the parent could see progess and development of their child clearly. If this makes any sense. Like a learning journey, but a goal for parents to become involved in and we could work with them so it is a preset goal wheras learning journeys are observations with next steps based on the observation.

 

Not sure though myself, the more i think about it, may just stick with the learning journeys alone - but I really want to try and get parents more involved in their child's development.

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I see your point, and agree totally.

 

We have the general tracking sheet to record observations and assess progess, but I don't think this is particularly helpful to parents.

 

I was looking more to have a sheet purely for goals that we (as nursery staff) and parents feel the child should be able to attain at the level they are at. Observations of this would be recorded and the parent could see progess and development of their child clearly. If this makes any sense. Like a learning journey, but a goal for parents to become involved in and we could work with them so it is a preset goal wheras learning journeys are observations with next steps based on the observation.

 

Not sure though myself, the more i think about it, may just stick with the learning journeys alone - but I really want to try and get parents more involved in their child's development.

 

 

I will try to attach what we give to parents - very simple but it goes down well. We don't necessarily fill in each of the 6 areas every time - this is one that I filled in as example to the staff when we started using it - I hope it is of some help!

I_am_good_at..._Example.doc

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Personally, I hate to think of parents setting goals or targets for their children there is so much pressure on children as it is and parents are so competitive with each other.

 

You could send home a sheet entitled my child's a star and parents can fill in what their child can do (eg sing a nursery rhyme or clap their hands depending on age) and if you really wanted you could have a box at the bottom that says I'd like my child to.. but you'll probably find things appear like sleep through the night or behave in a shopping trolley or even learn to read and write!

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Thanks for that Daisydoo :-)

 

I see your point suebear. Maybe some parents wouldn't be very realistic etc... i might have a rethink around this idea. Maybe just make them more aware of the next steps we have thought of and see if they now of asny observations to bear in mind.

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I completely agree with you Suebear. There is far too much pressure put on children (and parents) as it is once they start school I also think some parents are so competitive that to set targets and goals for children so young, well makes me feel quite uncomfortable. Children have such a short time in their early years, why worry about what they have to attain or not as the case would probably be for so many parents.

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I have a group of parents at the moment who are coming in to borrow books to help the children learn to read.....they have all bought phonic books as well.....I think I may need to do an information night...it seems whatever literature I give them and research to say not to hurry this process - letters and sounds information - they still insist on being in competition with each other...I hate it so much the poor children are being pushed too much too soon....one poor little lovely is having to do phonics this weekend....he barely strings a sentence together yet... :(:oxD:( :( :wacko: xD :rolleyes:

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I wasn't thinking of parents competing or wanting their child to be 'super advanced' for their age. Just that as we have to record observations and set targets/next steps in the nursery, it may help to make the parent aware of their child's progress and ability. Simple targets may even focus on a baby clapping hands or a child putting their own shoes on, washing/drying hands after the toilet.

 

I am also looking at doing a WOW! board to help children gain confidence and self esteem, displaying their achievements.o

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Thanks Cait - do your parents contribute much, or respond much to them?

 

Just I am also seeing if I can include some parent involvement and unclusion with it.

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Maz, thanks for sharing this.

 

Oh my goodness, my blood is boiling ! Research findings from Warwick University ?- it would have been nice if the article provided a link of somekind to the research. Surely, the findings have been mis-interpreted or not very well represented in this article.

 

I would perhaps accept that 'hot housing' of children, i.e. being taken to one 'activity' after another whilst possibly being prevented from engaging in their own initiated PLAY, may not have much benefit on a child.

 

I would be interested to know how the question was posed to parents when asked; 'how do they help their children learn', as I suspect many would not think to include talking to, playing with, shopping with, being with etc. etc. in response to such a question.

 

I don't understand the last paragraph about 'expensive equipment' - what a ridiculous statement to make !

 

I think that for a journalist to put out an article like this is irresponsible, many parents will read or get to hear about this and because it says it's from research believe it. It could potentially undermine some of the hard work that many, many people are doing to encourage more interaction between parents and their children.

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Guest jenpercy

About 40 years ago, I did a teaching practice in Moss Side, Manchester. Children came into school not having ever held a pencil or crayon and the difference was very visible at age 7.

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