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Preparing For My Registration Visit


emarshall3
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Im trying to fill in my preparation book and im really brain fuzle on a few things. Im hoping someone on here can help me as OFSTED are coming out on Friday - Argh!!!!

 

Here are the questions im stuck on trying to explain things.

1. How will i observe and make records of childrens developement? Ive put i shall watch and record in my observation log book then transfer into Learning Journey book

2. How will i use these records for the benefit of childre? Ive put record what they have learned and put down what i plan for further development.

3. What will i share with the parents? IM REALLY STUCK ON THIS!!!!

 

ALSO REALLY STUCK ON THIS ONE.

How will i plan activities for a baby under 12 month, a 2 yr old and a 4 yr old all together???????

 

PLEASE PLEASE SOMEONE HELP ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :o

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would you not share all that you have done with the parents - we share the book with the parent termly and ask for their involvement in the book - telling us things their child has done/said at home etc - it is meant to be a shared document. you would also perhaps say to the parent what you would be focussing on so they can support this at home and perhaps ask them if there is anything you could support at the setting x

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Oh what a Plea!!! Are you a childminder perhaps? It reads as if you are, i am sure you will find lots of wonderful help from other childminders on here shortly. Try to stem that panic - Ofsted Inspectors I feel are willing us on to do well - (not all get this message across alas!). I'm sure you will do well on Friday, it already sounds as if you are preparing well to me. I'm pre-school, so not going to be too much help to you. Good luck!

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Thanks Guys x

 

Yes im preparing to become a childminder - im just so mind boggled! Im trying really hard maybe a bit too hard and im getting myself into a tizzle over nothing. I guess i know what i need to say really but im not sure how to put it into words.

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Hi there - best of luck with your reg visit.

 

With your observations, remember that the point of them is so that you can assess childrens learning and development and then plan activities to help them move forward, as well as identify their interests, any issues they may have, their learning style, schemas etc.

 

You should share everything with parents, unless you have to make confidential records about a safeguarding concern. the more you share, the better your working relationship and the better the outcomes for the child. Parents should be encouraged to add comments to your observations, and add their observations to the learning journey too. If they are unable to write in it, then you can write for them but make it clear it is their input.

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I have just seen your last question. There is loads that children of all those ages can do - painting and playdough, for instance, chasing bubbles, heuristic play, playing with building blocks, musical instruments, small world, puzzles if they all have a different puzzle, sharing a story if you choose the right one, Simon says, peekaboo (baby will find it hilarious, toddler and older child can hide, older child may enjoy caring for baby), dressing up (baby could wear hats, explore fabrics) ball pool.

 

If you know your children well, and you use open ended resources then you can get them all playing the same thing.

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Hi

 

You will also need to let the inspectors know that you will be sharing your policies with parents, I'm presuming that childminders need to have policies and procedures ?!, also your ethos and aims maybe ?! Also, in striving to form positive relationships with parents - perhaps local knowledge of support and services they may be able to access/benefit from.

 

Good luck

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Hi! and welcome from one childminder to another!!

 

Relax - you're definitely thinking along the right lines. You'll use your observations to plan the "next steps" (as Ofsted refer to them) for each child. So if Sam arrives and says he's been on the train at the weekend you'd "plan" to get the train set out and talk to Sam about the number of carriages, what colours they are, behind and in front.......

 

You'll observe all the time and make notes or take photos to share with parents in the daily diary that goes home with the child, you'll do a more formal observation about once a term to see where the child is at against EYFS. "WOW" moments will be shared as and when they happen - first word, first time they zip their own coat, etc Parents will share these moments with you too so you can write them into the Learning Journey.

 

Partnership with Parents sounds scary but isn't! You'll share info verbally every time the child is dropped off and collected, plus what is in the diary (mine includes where we've been, what we've done, what the child has eaten, their nappies and rest times).

It is "best practice" to have written policies and procedures to share with parents. Have a look at the NCMA site for downloadable ones which you can personalise for your setting. I get my parents to sign to say they've read them and Ofsted liked that.

 

Planning for mixed age groups is also less scary when you get into it! Your example is for a 12 month old, a 2 year old and a 4 year old. Simple things are often the easiest to adapt. Playdough for instance - the 4 year old could help you weigh, measure and make the playdough giving lots of opportunities for maths language, the 2 year old can help choose the colouring for the playdough and would be able to use a rolling pin and cutters when playing with the dough, the 12 month old will be more about texture, smell and sensory language. I'm trying not to make you feel daft (hope I'm succeeding!) It really is a case of "it's quite simple really!"

 

There's a great article in the resources section about Cheerless or cheerful childminding in the face of the EYFS, which links all the things you do every day to the 6 areas of learning. I think you'll find it very reassuring and encouraging.

 

Shout if I can help any further, but I think you'll do fine on Friday!

 

Nona

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Thanks Guys, Im def along the right track then - glad to know. So much to think of and readt thru before Friday. You Guys have def put my mind to rest as i keep getting side tracked etc. Thanks so much and ill let you know how i get on.

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Well ive ha my pre reg visit from OFSTED - The lady who came was lovely so made it sooooo much more relaxed. Ive just gotta wait for my certificate to come through. The only thing i need to do is get a fireguard. Anyone know somewhere that i can get one from that doesnt look horrid?

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Well Done!!! ( can I say "told you you'd be fine" ?!? :o )

 

It's been a long time since I had to have a fireguard (thankfully! I always found they attracted the children who used it to either pull themselves up on, which wasn't safe even when fixed to the wall ,or as a large "posting" opportunity for small toys!)

 

The last one was from Argos, black with a domed top - I'd recommend you don't get one with a flat top as the children then use it as a shelf xD

 

Nona

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Guest cathy m

Pleased the pre-reg inspection went well

I have never used a fireguard and never use the fire when childminding.

I think many childminders have stopped using them for the reasons Nona pointed out

 

Cathy

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I was told that childminders have to have a fireguard unless they disconnect the fire from the mains. To me this is silly as i use my fire with my toddler around and she doesnt go near it. How are children meant to learn if we r being told to prevent them from going near it.

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I was told that childminders have to have a fireguard unless they disconnect the fire from the mains. To me this is silly as i use my fire with my toddler around and she doesnt go near it. How are children meant to learn if we r being told to prevent them from going near it.

 

Exactly!! and if you make that point to Ofsted they'll often take it on board. It's down to common sense, discouraging the children from going too near, teaching them that it's hot/dangerous and not leaving them unsupervised.

 

I'd double check that it's a necessity. It may be an urban myth in your area and Ofsted will be happy to rely on your own judgement.

 

Nona

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Ive got a letter coming out to me as one of my "need to do before i mind" so i may give them a call as i was told by one of my area people that it was not neccesary for me to have one but the Ofsted inspector said i HAVE to have one!!!! They are ugly and will ruin my newly wallpapered wall which took ages and a lot of money to do! My daughter doesnt go near the fire so i dont see the need for it!!!!!

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It's all about assessing risk and being confident stating your case to Ofsted!!

 

Perhaps complete a risk assessment and plan your converstaion before you give Ofsted a call - I can't think of a childminder I know who still has a fireguard :o

 

Good Luck!

 

Nona

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How about giving RoSPA a call, (Royal Society for Prevention of Accidents) - they may give you some good advice, may even be able to recommend a fire guard you could get along with. It may be that you needn't have the type that is anchored to the wall, but a free standing one which you can put away when not using the fire - then give Ofsted a call with your risk assessment all completed.

 

 

I wonder how old your Ofsted Inspector was - I am early 50's and I can remember public information films on t.v. when I was small about children falling into open fires or electric fires, their nightdresses catching on fire because they weren't flameproof then and there was a huge drive to get families to have fireguards to prevent these types of needless accidents.

 

I agree with Nona, that the fireguards were used as shelves, posting games and for drying the washing on a wet day - not ideal at all!

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I agree with Nona, that the fireguards were used as shelves, posting games and for drying the washing on a wet day - not ideal at all!

 

xD I got rid of the fireguard but now we have 2 celestial parrotlets (mini parrots!) in a largish cage and the children used this instead. The birds were daily offered treats - small toys, food and, of course, fingers!!

 

I had the "brainwave" of fitting clear perspex screens at floor height around the cage, which poor hubby had to design and make :o Mrs O loved them, though!!!

 

Great idea about checking with RoSPA - plenty of facts to back up your argument!

 

Nona

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