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Hello

I am hoping to get some advise. How do you know if a child is ready to toilet train and how do you best explain to a parent if a child isnt ready to toilet train. I have also been looking for some leaflet's to support Parents.

I would be greatful for any help.

 

Andrea

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The 'old wives tale'of readiness is if they are 'single-stepping' up stairs or steps. Was allegedly something to do with development of the brain, but I don't know if any research was ever done to prove it.

 

I have to say that over the years I've found it to be reasonably accurate. Has anyone else heard of this one?

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Haven't heard that one Cait!

 

Girls tend to be ready when they know they have wee'd or soiled their nappy i.e they are able to communicate

 

Boys: not sure as

girls tend to train earlier than boys

 

Oh and also when children do 'big wees' in their nappy they are ready.

 

That's what I've found anyway!

ppp

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wow, never heard of that one! will have do some observations on that.

I think as soon as a child show discomfort/awareness of weeing/pooing (eg. some children will go into corner or leave the room to poo in their nappy) they are ready to be toilet trained.

 

I'm not sure about how to explain to parents if a child is not ready -i have the opposite problem usually

why do you think they are not ready - too many accidents, no awareness of needing to go before an accident

I know when I toilet trained my own children I stayed in for 2 or 3 days and just had them with nappies off (no pants or trousers) to make it easier for them to either get to potty or just to be aware of whne they were weeing - you could suggest that to parents!?

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Hi

 

As we take children at our pre-school from 2 this is something we deal with a lot. We ask parents to put them in pull ups untill they are very ready / almost completely potty trained. It has to b a balance as we have lots of children to care for and with the best will in the world can`t spend ages changing children who have constant accidents.

 

We work closely with parents and key workers discuss this with them and treat each case individualy. But ultimitely it`s up to the parents to train the children. Communication with parents and carers is the key.

 

Sally

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Haven't heard that one Cait!

 

Girls tend to be ready when they know they have wee'd or soiled their nappy i.e they are able to communicate

 

Boys: not sure as

girls tend to train earlier than boys

 

Oh and also when children do 'big wees' in their nappy they are ready.

 

That's what I've found anyway!

ppp

 

Hi,

 

very interesting. But how will i know if there nappy is full because of a "big wee".

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wow, never heard of that one! will have do some observations on that.

I think as soon as a child show discomfort/awareness of weeing/pooing (eg. some children will go into corner or leave the room to poo in their nappy) they are ready to be toilet trained.

 

I'm not sure about how to explain to parents if a child is not ready -i have the opposite problem usually

why do you think they are not ready - too many accidents, no awareness of needing to go before an accident

I know when I toilet trained my own children I stayed in for 2 or 3 days and just had them with nappies off (no pants or trousers) to make it easier for them to either get to potty or just to be aware of whne they were weeing - you could suggest that to parents!?

 

I never heart of that either, will have to do some observations myself. :-). Very interesting, i am asking for help as i have a child in my room who's mum would like him to be toilet trained (just turned 2, no recognisable words yet) and put him in pants for the last 2 days. He has constant accidents and doesnt actually understand what is happening.

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Hi

 

As we take children at our pre-school from 2 this is something we deal with a lot. We ask parents to put them in pull ups untill they are very ready / almost completely potty trained. It has to b a balance as we have lots of children to care for and with the best will in the world can`t spend ages changing children who have constant accidents.

 

We work closely with parents and key workers discuss this with them and treat each case individualy. But ultimitely it`s up to the parents to train the children. Communication with parents and carers is the key.

 

Sally

 

Thank you Sally, i truely believe in the saying "Its up to the paretns to train their child". I have discussed this with the parent and advised to start toilet training at home first, for example taking the nappy off whilst at home and showing where the potty/toilet is etc. But the next week she brought him in pants but did mention he hasnt done any wee's for her yet either. I just find it very unfair on staff to be dealing with the accidents all the time. Also i am worried that it will put the child's confidence down in future.

 

Andrea

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Parents may becoming more confused over the whole potty training thing and expecting daycare staff to do it - like many other things they see us as the professionals and we should teach their child everything they need to know!!

The report recently saying that more and more children are turning up at Reception in nappies which was once unheard of made me wonder just what is happening in this area of childcare now.

 

I always say to my parents not to force the child into being clean before they start at our pre-school, especially when they ask, does he/she have to be clean and dry, but I do make it known that we will follow their lead in this, not the other way round.

 

We have one little chap now who seems to save up his dirty nappy for us - mum says he uses a potty at home and she has told him that he should when he is with us - he is wearing pull ups, he seems to wait for her to leave pre-school, then he goes off into a corner and does it, then is very coy and upset about it when we suggest going to change his nappy. Maybe pull ups confuse some children. In terms of cleaning up a child, give me a nappy anyday, pull ups are a pain.

 

.

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andreadavies - I seem to have trained more girls than boys for some unknown reason. But a 'big wee' is when you and their parents notice their nappy is more full than usual. Often parents will comment that they're child is weeing more and more nappies are needed!

 

ppp

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Parents may becoming more confused over the whole potty training thing and expecting daycare staff to do it - like many other things they see us as the professionals and we should teach their child everything they need to know!!

The report recently saying that more and more children are turning up at Reception in nappies which was once unheard of made me wonder just what is happening in this area of childcare now.

 

I always say to my parents not to force the child into being clean before they start at our pre-school, especially when they ask, does he/she have to be clean and dry, but I do make it known that we will follow their lead in this, not the other way round.

 

We have one little chap now who seems to save up his dirty nappy for us - mum says he uses a potty at home and she has told him that he should when he is with us - he is wearing pull ups, he seems to wait for her to leave pre-school, then he goes off into a corner and does it, then is very coy and upset about it when we suggest going to change his nappy. Maybe pull ups confuse some children. In terms of cleaning up a child, give me a nappy anyday, pull ups are a pain.

 

.

Thank you for sharing this with me. The boy doesnt need to be toilet trained at all. We are very helpful in toilet training once children have recognized some signs of understanding or communicating. It this case its more "MUM" who wants him to be toilet train, but i just dont believe he is ready yet.

I found a litte booklet in my old study folder so i am going to take that into work today, photocopy it and pass it on. It gives a few ideas on when a child may be ready for Toilet traing.

Any other examples of a booklet would be great.

 

Andrea

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Thank you for sharing this with me. The boy doesnt need to be toilet trained at all. We are very helpful in toilet training once children have recognized some signs of understanding or communicating. It this case its more "MUM" who wants him to be toilet train, but i just dont believe he is ready yet.

I found a litte booklet in my old study folder so i am going to take that into work today, photocopy it and pass it on. It gives a few ideas on when a child may be ready for Toilet traing.

Any other examples of a booklet would be great.

 

Andrea

 

There is this one HERE It is from the ladybird book site, but I have done a copy for several parents. :o

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That's how I always do it too

Me too! xD

 

Have been soooo lucky (touch wood) with my new intake - only two not 'trained' and one of those is really - she wears a pull up but uses the toilet really well........

 

Very different story to last year which was an absolute NIGHTMARE! :o

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That's how I always do it too

 

 

however, you still have to take trousers and shoes off to put new pull ups on

 

I would say to the parent that the child is just not ready. It's a waste of his day to keep having to be cleaned up if he is showing no awareness or cannot communicate his needs yet

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You know that you can tear the sides of pull ups, at which point they are no different to nappies for changing. :o

 

 

Yes I know you can tear down the sides, but somehow I still manage to get ick all over my gloves :( With a nappy if you didn't want to take the shoes and trousers off etc. you could whip one off and put one on.

 

We have one boy who wears lace up Kickers - getting these little bootees on and off is so frustrating.

 

I just need to moan occasionally xD

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Yes I know you can tear down the sides, but somehow I still manage to get ick all over my gloves :( With a nappy if you didn't want to take the shoes and trousers off etc. you could whip one off and put one on.

 

We have one boy who wears lace up Kickers - getting these little bootees on and off is so frustrating.

 

I just need to moan occasionally xD

Panders - I read that as lace up KNICKERS :o I thought WHAT!!! :(

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Panders - I read that as lace up KNICKERS :o I thought WHAT!!! xD

ooh sounds like a plan!

 

ours change into slippers or plimsolls when they come indoors so it's simpler. and WHY WHY WHY DO THEY MAKE LACE UP SHOES FOR TINY CHILDREN!!!!! We have one child who has them, whose Mum just pulls them off without undoing them - the laces are double knotted which is a real pain!

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Panders - I read that as lace up KNICKERS :o I thought WHAT!!! :(

 

:( I also read it as "lace up Knickers" :(

I really dont mind pull up's or nappy's, i do believe summer term is the best to start toilet training. xD

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Panders - I read that as lace up KNICKERS :o I thought WHAT!!! :(

 

:( I also read it as "lace up Knickers" :(

I really dont mind pull up's or nappy's, i do believe summer term is the best to start toilet training. xD

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