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Reception Dropping Off Time


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Hi, was talking to some of the other staff in school today about what happens in the mornings in my class - the parents stay for a bit and do a writing task with their children before the child goes off to choose what they will do and the parent then leaves. It means that parents are in my room until 9.10 each day. One of the other teachers made a comment today that at her daughters new school (where she will be reception in sept) the teacher said parents should just leave the children at the door from day one which she felt was the best thing to do - I felt like I was being told in a round about way that I am storing up problems for Year one by encouraging my parents to stay each day. Just wanted to find out what other Reception classes do as I dont want to cause problems for other teachers but I really like seeing the parents each day and find it is easier to sort out problems as they arise this way. Long winded way round but basically what happens in other reception classes please?

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Our parents bring children in, stay for a chat with them about where they will start working, settle everything in, chat with me - probably takes 10-15 minutes. It's busy but relaxed and informal - I really like the chance to talk to the parents before the day begins as they've often got significant things to talk about / ask me / tell me then.

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I think it's good. By year one, these children feel such a lot more grown up because they aren't the youngest. If parents are able to spare the time in the morning then it really involves them in their children's learning. It takes them nicely from the large involvement they have in their child's preschool years to the less intense involvement of school life.

 

When I was in the Infants, many moons ago, there was a painted line on the playgrounds that parents couldn't cross. My Mum had to wave me goodbye from the gate. It's got to be better than that!!!!

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My daughter's combined YR/Y1 class has the same format as yours for the beginning of the day. The children completely accept that it changes when they move on to the next class and so do the parents. In fact the children are proud to be seen as bigger and the only problem I had with my older one was when I really needed to tell a teacher something and she didn't want me to come in!

 

Lots of things change as they move between classes. Why should this cause a particular problem?

 

Don't change something which feels right. I am sure the parents really appreciate it. I did!

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Ems and Emmajess - you sound like wonderful teachers to me xD

 

I am pre-school.....but recently spent a day in our local schools reception class...... children are 'left' at the door (not even classroom door - school door) they filter in as they arrive - stow their bags in their trays, select a book and sit quietly at their tables looking at their books until registration time ...... I suppose some may think this is great, very orderly and quiet.....not me - I wondered what had happened to those confident, bubbly children I had sent to school 6 months earlier :o

 

Stick to what works for the children, for the parents and for you!

 

Sunnyday

Edited by sunnyday
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One of the schools I work with have the first 15 minutes of every day as a time when parents come into class and listen to their child read/read to their child or do an activity or whatever is appropriate. This happens from Nursery to Year 6! I have to say that observing the start of school is wonderful - it is calm and quiet and children start their day ready to learn. In these days when parents seem to have less and less time this provides a good opportunity for quality time and engagement as well as promoting positive relationships with parents.

But each school is different and approaches parental partnerships in different ways. I would say that it is vital to build positive relationships from day one and encourage places to find ways that work for them.

Often we are so quick to chase parents out of the classroom and then wonder why we struggle to get them involved or supportive later on!

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Thank you for your replies - I was worried as I like this way of working and really dont want it to change. feel better now about arguing my corner and sticking up for what I think is right!

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Thank you for your replies - I was worried as I like this way of working and really dont want it to change. feel better now about arguing my corner and sticking up for what I think is right!

 

Absolutely!!!

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I am about to encourage parents to come in for 10-15 mins to drop of children! I wanted this to be a sharing time for children to share learning journeys and parents to add to these whenever they feel necessary. It is also a time for me to get to know parents rather than seeing them from a distance as they are afterall child's first teacher!! Good to hear others feel the same.

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If you look at the EYFS section about parents as partners this is where it all begins. Building up relationships with the parents in an informal way like you do is worth it. They will feel comfortable about coming into school for other things- parental involvement is so important!. Take a look at some of the research to back up your arguments- also the PEAL site where they are looking at ways settings can encourage parents to come in- stick to your guns!!

 

PEAL

 

EYFS

 

:o

Edited by surfer
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We've always had parents coming in with their children - although some children come with before school club and just come in on their own, a few others have started coming in on their own (mums have said they have asked to do this), lots more mums/dads/grans come in - we're always available for a chat, to share news with parents or who ever drops them off. Some parents want to chat more than others, some parents just want to come in and do an activity with their child before they leave. If it works for you, why change it? As everyone says, children are quite sensible and see coming into Y1 on their own as part of them getting bigger/more grown up. If you change things you may find children being upset - I'd certainly worry about children being expected to come in from day 1 on their own - though some children of course will be able to do this! This most important thing is that the children are happy and confident in coming into school.

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Hi

 

I just wanted to support what everyone else has been saying. I joined my school last Sept to work in Reception and have spent the year being thanked by parents for giving them the opportunity to be able to come in and see their child settled first thing on a morning, as well as feeling a part of their school life. Apparently in the past it was a case of drop at the door and go and the only opportunity that they had to come in was on parents evenings. How to make a partnership with parents!!!!

 

You just stick to your guns!

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First of all ems, that sounds lovely - I'm sure the parenst who stay really appreciate it. We encourage the parents to come in with their child to help them settle and then they gradually stop coming in when it is right for the child. The morning is the hardest time for many children so to say the parents can't come in at all seems very harsh! This year I had one child who was coming in on her own from day 2 where as other children's parents are still coming in now, we really emphasize that it is what is best for the children is the important thing. We were so relaxed about it this year we had parents asking us to stop them coming in!

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ems.........................keep doing what you know to be right!! At our local school, parents are not allowed into the classroom unless specifically invited and if they do go in, they aren't allowed to stand on the carpet area, but must stay by the door. I have had several new parents come back to us in tears over the way they have been treated!

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I'd stay stick with what your doing and ignore her, the EYFS clearly lays out the importance of working in partnership with parents, and that is what your doing. I don't think we need a document to tell us this any way of course you should let parents come in and chat and see what their child is doing.

 

Also year 1 are supposed to 'do the EYFS' in the first term any way (along side the NC) so in my opinion she should follow your lead and have parents in the class in the morning too!

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ems - your way sounds lovely!

 

The primary school I take childminded children to changed their system (for all years) 3 years ago.

 

No longer would a member of staff be "on duty" in the playground from 8.50am. Instead the first bell would ring at 8.50 and a second at 9am. Children can go in between these times and settle into themselves their classrooms.

 

There are support staff on the doors taking messages regarding the children but you cannot speak to the teacher without arranging to come in at the end of the day!

 

I can't see how this is "best practice" - surely it would be like me insisting that parents hand their babies and small children over on the doorstep? :o

 

I hope you'll stick to what you know works best!

 

Nona

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Hi

 

Just l;ike to add my support to the view that parents should be welcome and why not let them stay..in our school all parents are welsome to come in the classroom in a morning and stay for the morning tasks - a full 20 minutes, even in yr 6!

 

Jay

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In fact just to add, I approch the parents who throw their child in the door and who's face I don't see, explaining that because the end of the day can be a bit rushed they all need to enter the classroom in case I need to chat to them and they need to support their child with our morning routine jobs!

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This sounds lovely! I would be interested in introducing something like this in September. I have a few questions that you might be able to answer.

What happens about the children who have younger siblings? I'm all up for parents coming in but don't want to have everything trashed by younger brothers and sisters. Also the pre-schools in the village start at 9am so they'd want to get their children there.

Also what kind of tasks do parents do with parents?

 

Thanks! xx

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I'm afraid I am going to go against the consensus here!

 

I've worked in schools where parents are allowed in to stay with their children and those where the children line up in the playground and go in with the Teacher and I prefer the latter.

 

It could be that the experience where the parents came in was rather awful because the parents used the time to compare their child against others - was their child 'better' than X, what group they were in, who they were sat by, why was X who started at the same time as Y in a different group, why is she sitting by a boy and not her friend, X is on blue reading books but Y is on purple - Arrghhh!!! (This was a school in a very affluent and competitive area) The number of 'chats' parents wanted after comparing their child in the morning was unbelievable - in the end we hid our group lists and star charts!

 

Whilst I support and encourage parents as partners, I think it depends on the some of the parents and home back grounds. In the school I mentioned, I woould definitely changed it if I could! Some of the schools I have and currently work in, it would be a very good idea to have parents in and involve them more in their children's learning, but for some children the clear definition of school and home is needed for them. Some children in my experience may have a home situation that is rather disorganised and fraught and having that defined way (e.g. lined up outside) and coming into an organised, calm atmposhere where things are more certain is of benefit and sets them up for a successful day in school.

 

When parents are encouraged to come in in the morning, I also feel that it is discriminating (?) against children whose parents are not able to stay and perhaps put them into breakfast club beacuse of work commitments and I did really feel for those children where this was the case and made sure that these children had extra attention from the TA. Those children would often on the occasional occasion when they parent was ablt to come in say 'I wish you could come every day like X's Mum'. Major guilt for parent.

 

My niece is about to start school in September. She has been to Nursery since 18 months and happily waves Mum off at the door in Nursery to go and see her friends. Nursery is her 'territory' and although she is happy to show Mum, me or Grandma some feature of Nursery or something she has done that day when we pick her up, she is usually ready to take us home! (She is a very happy bunny at Nursery). Reverting to a parent coming in at school (which hers don't do), would be a step back for her and although my sister will be on maternity leave for much of her Reception Year, would if this was not the case prove difficult as my sister works on the opposite side of town and starts at 9.00am. How would either feel if she was unable to stay? I know my sister feels awful that she has had to work whilst my niece has been growing up but unfortunately with a mortgage and the cost of living she has had no choice.

 

I am sorry to have gone against the grain and go on for so long, but I do think that schools need to think about the effects on parents and children who need to work and not just for those who can stay.

 

L

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I am sorry to have gone against the grain and go on for so long, but I do think that schools need to think about the effects on parents and children who need to work and not just for those who can stay

 

I take your point here but in my setting we have many parents who are new to the school system in this country - over half my class have EAL and their parents appreciate the opportunity to come in and see what school is all about - we have worked very hard to get these parents into school and build their confidence. I also have parents who work, (3 of my children have parents who work in the school) they are not able to come and support their children but another parent will or myself or my LSA will - I feel strongly that the parents who wish to come and stay shouldnt be told they cant becuase some of my parents are unable to. Obviously it is different in all settings and maybe you have to weigh up the pros and cons for each setting individually. Personally for my setting I feel the benefits outweigh the negatives :o

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I am sorry to have gone against the grain and go on for so long, but I do think that schools need to think about the effects on parents and children who need to work and not just for those who can stay.

 

L

 

Surely if you have the opportunity to involve some of the parents, nip some of the problems in the bud, help some of the children settle more easily, etc, this will give the teacher more time to support those other families who cannot be there at the start of the day at other times and in other ways.

 

Why would you penalise some families just because this format does not suit everyone? EYFS is about meeting each childs needs in the way that best suits them.

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