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Hi All

 

Does anyone know if companies have to pay you if you dont work bank holidays.

 

Our company does not, the nursery is closed bank holidays, parents still get charged, company decision not to open bank holidays, therefore staff are not working. However the company do not pay the staff, i dont think this is fair. :o

 

Do you get paid, how does it work, are they breaking laws by not paying staff.

 

Most are on minimum wage, they dont get sick pay only SSP, is a bank holiday paid to much to ask. they are not losing money as parents are still paying!!!

 

thanks all

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Hi

 

They get charged because when the owners work out fees, they just do weekly fee x 52 / 12.

 

its a day nursery so they do close apart from main holidays. i think most nurseries are like this.

 

ice

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Hi Ice

If you look at this site it tells you all about paid holidays etc. It states

 

 

Public and bank holidays

You do not have a statutory right to paid leave on bank and public holidays. If your employer gives paid leave on a bank or public holiday, this can count towards your minimum holiday entitlement. There are eight permanent bank and public holidays in England and Wales (nine in Scotland and ten in Northern Ireland).

 

So your bank holidays could be counted in your statutory days off.

I know some nurseries charge parents fees because they pay staff for the bank holidays-yours seems to be getting the best of both worlds.

Linda

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As an employer, my answer comes from the other side!

 

Yes my staff do get paid for bank holidays (if it falls on their normal working day) however, this is deducted from their annual leave allocation.

 

For me, it is the best way as staff are not working so less holiday cover i have to provide. I worked out the other day that by adding together all of the employees holiday entitlement together, it is equal to having two and half staff members off each day of the year!

 

For this reason, we charge parents 50% retainer on bank hols to enable us to afford holiday cover throughout the year.

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As an employer, my answer comes from the other side!

 

Yes my staff do get paid for bank holidays (if it falls on their normal working day) however, this is deducted from their annual leave allocation.

 

For me, it is the best way as staff are not working so less holiday cover i have to provide. I worked out the other day that by adding together all of the employees holiday entitlement together, it is equal to having two and half staff members off each day of the year!

 

For this reason, we charge parents 50% retainer on bank hols to enable us to afford holiday cover throughout the year.

 

 

Hi lucy

 

Thanks for reply.

 

So your staff get 20 days holiday and the bank holidays are part of this. so they get to take 12 days off of there choice.

 

Am i understanding that right?

 

thanks

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All employees are currently entitled to a minimum 4.8 weeks holiday rising to 5.6 weeks on 1st April 2009. This minimum entitlement is inclusive of bank holidays and is paid pro rata for part time staff.

 

For example if your holiday year is 1st April 2009 to 31st March 2010 and you work 5 days a week for 40 weeks of the year your holiday entitlement is:

 

5 days x 5.6 weeks = 28 days this is then divided by 46.4 weeks (that's 52 weeks of the year less 5.6 weeks hol entitlement) then x 40 weeks actually worked = total of 24.13 days holiday pay.

 

employers can't round down but they can round up or pay the exact amount of time as part days.

 

There is a handy calculator here:

 

http://www.businesslink.gov.uk/bdotg/actio...58926&r.s=e

 

RR

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The statutory entitlement for full time staff (mine work 40 hrs per week) is currently 24 days per year, this rises to 28 from April, so all my staff get the 8 bank hols and then another 20 days of their choice.

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Hi

 

i work in a private day nursery, open all year round bar bank holidays. parents are charged fees for bank holiday's. staff get paid for bank holiday's in addition to their normal holiday allowance. therefore, for example this year i have 21 days holiday and all bank holidays.

 

 

Dawn

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I pay my staff for their Bank Holiday off, and don't take it from their annual allowance. They are paid such a poor rate that I'm quite happy to do this as a friendly gesture. They do work additional minutes at the start and end of each day, for no pay, so it would be a bit poor if I couldn't demonstrate some goodwill as a small gesture of thanks.

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in my setting only full time staff get paid bank hols plus 24 days hols (28 from April) we have to save 3hols for over christmas period. part time do not get paid bank hols but can use a holiday to get paid if they wish. our owner is really good, i had to take last week off as baby was ill and he has let me use 5 days from next financial years hols (april-march) so i dont lose pay. (i told the baby he wasnt allowed t be ill again til april but he didnt listen!!!!)

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I pay my staff for their Bank Holiday off, and don't take it from their annual allowance. They are paid such a poor rate that I'm quite happy to do this as a friendly gesture. They do work additional minutes at the start and end of each day, for no pay, so it would be a bit poor if I couldn't demonstrate some goodwill as a small gesture of thanks.

 

Wow Cait, that is a fantastic gesture!

 

I so wish i was in the position to do this as well, just did a quick calculation of how much it would cost my company and worked out as just below £18,000 per year :o , so unfortunately will be sticking to the way i do things!

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