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HI

 

After doing day one of a first aid course, today (i might add a damm saturday, and we are not being paid for it!!!!) i have come away wondering what to do re the plaster situtaion. The guy doing the training said that it is important to cover all cuts witha sterile dressing and if its a small cut a plaster will suffice. BUT we don't out plasters on, the other managers said it was because it is an ofsted thing. The guy who did the course said that we should put plasters on.

 

who is right?

and what do you do in your nursery?

 

Dawn

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Marion is right to point this out that some children could be alergic to plasters and the adhesive.

 

I for one know I am not allowed to use plastic plasters that we commonly use, I have a severe reation to plastic including the masks for oxgen, oh what fun that is when I have a severe Asthma attack. Now I have to carry my own supplies of sentive plasters which I know I am fine to use, not sure what would happen if I had to do a cooking activity consdering your are ment to use blue plasters.

 

 

Beth

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I would use lint and micropore tape. I say 'would' because in the five years I've owned my preschool I have not had the need to use a dressing for a cut. I have had to use lint and micropore dressing only twice 1/ a blister on a childs heel where her shoe rubbed and 2/ to cover the top of a childs foot which was sore with excema and again his shoe rubbed. I would have let them go barefoot but we can't allow that in our hall because drawing puins are used by other hall users to put up displays ( very painful if one is stood on).

 

So just out of curiosity, how many times have others actually had to use plasters? I find a bit of tissue and cold water is sufficient to 'magic' away any pain of grazed knees. ( although this we haven't had for quite a few years.

 

Peggy

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Thinking about it, we haven't needed to put plasters on a child. We have got sterile pads and micropore should we need it.

We have been told not to use plasters for children, on our last First Aid course.

I do actually keep "sensitive" plasters - but not in the first aid box - for staff should they need it.

 

Sue J

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http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/_doc/4421/GFA...ce%20schools%22

 

Just looked and the DFEE guidance on first aid for schools which was handed out on the course and it says

 

minimum provision of first-aid items would be:

a leaflet giving general advice on first aid (see list of

publications in Annex A);

 

20 individually wrapped sterile adhesive dressings

 

two sterile eye pads;

four individually wrapped triangular bandages

(preferably sterile);

six safety pins;

six medium sized (approximately 12cm x 12cm)

individually wrapped sterile unmedicated wound

dressings;

two large (approximately 18cm x 18cm) sterile

individually wrapped unmedicated wound

dressings;

one pair of disposable gloves.

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We were told to use plasters on our first aid course because the risk of a child getting a cut infected, especially out on playing fields etc. where people may walk their dogs, was more of a danger than an allergic reaction. I know some people have very bad reactions to plasters in which case parents would need to let us know and either provide an alternative or we would not use anything.

Like Peggy in the 17 years I have run pre-school we have rarely used plasters. Most times it is parents coming in asking for one if their child has fallen on the way. Last week we used a sterile pad with micropore tape on a child who had a bad cut on his hand, sustained at home the day before, and it looked infected and quite nasty.

Linda

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have to say all advice given is very contraversal..we were told on 12 hr 1st aid course not to use plasters unless really needed...we dont.... only used a couple in the last two years and parents sign to say we can use hypo allergenic ones.... :D

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We are in a school and the old advice was to not put any plasters on, but those attending 1st Aid courses this year have been told this has now changed, we are to put on plasters (or a suitable covering if there is a possibility they may be allergic) if there is any sign of blood.

We do get through quite a few but mostly its by the older children.

Edited by Guest
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Guest tinkerbell

We asre not allowed to use plasters, just cold water to rinse the graze and leave it.

Tinkerbellx

This week we have had about 5 children falling and graszing their knees!

Tinkerbell

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I find it hard to imagine why I would need 4 triangular bandages but its there on the recommended list! We have sensitive plasters in our box and haven't been told not to use them.

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At the school I teach in at the moment we do use plasters - and quite a lot! - because all our first aiders have been told to use them to cover wounds/grazes - we also use antispetic wipes - again because the training received tells us to.

 

However, in the past, at other schools I have worked at, plasters were a big NO NO and so were wipes - just water was used.

 

When I saw a child having a plaster put on at my present school for the first time I was really quite shocked!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Parents do advise of any allergies to plasters.

 

Its all very confusing!

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No cotton wool or lint at all - was our advice on our most recent first aid training. Rinse with running cold water. Yes, rules have changed and plasters are now allowed as there has been some kind of research done that there is greater risk of infection/cross contamination from an open cut/graze than there is from an allergic response to a plaster, however, if possible avoid plasters and use non sticky individually wrapped sterile dressing attached with micropore tape.

 

This was a first Aid course myself and a colleauge attended May 2006 under the 'new ways of Inspection' Regime .

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been advised to use plasters on last 2 1st aid courses attended by staff, as said by others permission slip signed, and hypoallergenic ones used, more risk of cross contaminaion by blood products and infections than allergic reactions given as the reasoning.

Have recently had several parents ask if we would put a plaster on one in particular as the nursery the child attended refused to do it and called mum out from work to put one on the child. This was an issue in a local school too, hit the national papers that one!!

They would not even put one on with her permission over the phone, she was far from happy and moved the child to us and a childminder. Ofsted did not ask about plasters but as it is recorded in accident book and she read through it was aware of our policy. we have had to use them a few times the last year. Had to buy new supply. very hard to find suitable ones as sue said with no latex.

 

Inge

Edited by Inge
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We were told on our course back in july not to use plasters but sterile pad and micropore. I haven't used plasters for years, due to allergies. I'm like Peggy in 17 years have only had to use a pad a couple of times. Magic wet pad works every time. cotton wool has always been a no because of bits getting left in the woulnd. also this time we were reminded about the latex gloves. we go through boxes of gloves, as we use them for everything.

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I never use plasters at preschool although we keep a stock for parents to use for cuts on the way to school.

Years ago a lunch time supervisor used a plaster on my daughters knee at school. We didn't know until then that she had an allergy to them. The resultant itchy rash lasted ages.

 

 

Al

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Hi everybody,

I'm new to the forum! Wish I'd subscribed ages ago but had to convince old man it would benefit me! :o

Just recently had a child at the nursery cut his finger with scissors - I know sounds bad! but we were their - he was so pleased with himself as it was the first time he could actualy cut but got carried away and cut the finger behind the paper - it pulled small area of nail off therefore bleeding loads - we ended up phonoing mum because it just needed a plaster to stop the bleeding and guaze and tape were so cumbersome over such a little finger! Due to this we've just sent out consent forms for plasters and if parents have a preference for certain plasters they pop some in their bags

 

CupOT

Edited by Guest
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Hi CupOT, welcome from me too. :D

 

The use/non-use of plasters is very confusing, another area where there is no actual legislation, like helping children at the toilet. I've never heard Ofsted say we should/shouldnt/can or cant. Clear guidlines would be helpful. :o

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Welcome Cup OT don't get to addicaed.

 

Sue R - it's ok using vinyal goves but unfortunatily I have a rare allergy to plastic including gloves, there is a new type of glove which is blue but i have forgotten the name of them, we used them on my first aid course in May of this year. :o

 

 

Beth

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