Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Staffing and rotas.


Sporter
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi! I am in the process of buying a day nursery which I will start running / managing in Sept. I have taught in infant schools for 12 years as a qualified teacher and have run my own childminding business for three years. I am looking forward to the challenge!

I am currently in the process of recruiting staff. I will need one more full time member of staff, and a part time member of staff. Through conversations with nursery nurses I know, I'm told that a lot of nurseries change staff rotas on a weekly basis, so the hours are not fixed (although the number of hours required to work will remain constant). Is this correct?

Thank you for your help x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi sporter, welcome to the forum, you'll find loads of help on its way for your new venture.

staff rotas will depend on size of setting, and the hours you are open. Most day nurseries are open eg 8 til 6 ish and therefore have shifts, so that some work early and others work later. A rota ensures noonehas to always work one or the other unless they want to. With a small team, you may not have to do this. Plus the larger the nursery, the more likely there will be staff having holidays so that has to be managed as well.

Have you decided what hours you will be open yet?

Good luck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think what they probably mean is that sometimes staff are contracted to work for example 24 hours rather than set days. This allows managers to allocate staff as required by numbers of children - lots of children full time hours, fewer children then contracted hours. Not everyone does this but it allows for the peaks and troughs of when children move onto school in sept for example. Staff then learn on a weekly basis what they will be working the following week. It also allows flexibility for staff if they need time off for appointments and means that You have relief staff to cover sickness and holidays! Downside - there may be no full time staff which may not suit everyone!

Edited by Ancaster
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you! The setting is registered for 26 children, so quite small. At the moment, it operates as a pre school and is open term time only and 9-3. I will be operating 7am-6.30pm year round.

Obviously to start with, the majority of the children will continue with these hours. However, all of the children I currently childmind for are coming to the new setting, and they will continue to require full day care. As the original nursery children leave to go to school, I hope to replace them with younger children needing full day care.

I was just surprised that somebody would be willing to be contracted to work for example, 20 hours a week, but for those hours to be given to them the week before, and they can be at any time within 7am to 6.30. How do they plan a personal life? So much to think about!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you! The setting is registered for 26 children, so quite small. At the moment, it operates as a pre school and is open term time only and 9-3. I will be operating 7am-6.30pm year round.

Obviously to start with, the majority of the children will continue with these hours. However, all of the children I currently childmind for are coming to the new setting, and they will continue to require full day care. As the original nursery children leave to go to school, I hope to replace them with younger children needing full day care.

I was just surprised that somebody would be willing to be contracted to work for example, 20 hours a week, but for those hours to be given to them the week before, and they can be at any time within 7am to 6.30. How do they plan a personal life? So much to think about!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know it seems a little unorthodox but it does work both ways. I can't think of anything worse than working from 7-6.30 - it's a very long day; but divided into shift patterns it works very well! There used to be quite a lull from September until around Christmas, but this doesn't seem to be the case so much now. Hours are discussed at interview and staff asked what their ideal hours would be, the nursery then offering those hours. Staff request days/hours/holidays off and the nursery is able to accommodate those requests. There are core staff in each room and floating staff which facilitates an effective key person system and also helps massively with transition from room to room!

 

To be honest with you one of the places that employs my business is a preschool, term time only, registered for 26 children and one of the main issues is that all staff are contracted for the same hours! It really doesn't work - when September comes around and numbers drop to just 14 on role, only 2 staff required but 3 being paid as their contracts dictate!!

 

You do have a lot to consider but what an exciting time for you!!

 

Good luck with your new venture - this forum is a fab place for info and opinions.

Edited by Ancaster
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok thank you for that! I think I understand! So in the example you cite, the "extra" member of staff who is surplus to requirements in the "lull" period, is simply not offered any hours? What I am struggling with, is how anybody would want a job which might not need them, and therefore not pay them, for some months. I am trying to think how I would "sell" this at interview, especially as in my area there is a shortage of nursery nurses.

I understand the shift pattern bit, and that the very long days might not appeal (but they would only work a four day week if they worked long days)!

 

Thank you x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also keep in mind that staff to child consistency ie with Key Workers is important. I understand it is a business and needs to work financially and it is hard to achieve the perfect model initially.

 

it is just the nature of childcare settings that many children leave for reception in September and hours are normally reduced at this time and as long as staff understand this and it is fairly distributed throughout your staff (if possible) then all should be ok.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)