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Absolutely no sense of fear!


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We have a 2 yr old who has absolutely no sense of fear to the point he needs 1-1 for his own safety. He is a lovely little chap who has the usual 2 yr old tantrums but we are at a lost on how to keep him safe. His parents are struggling as well - Dad narrowly missed running him over the other day when he had let himself out of the house - fortunately Dad's car has a reverse camera so he saw him stood on the drive!!#

We have already moved the garden around after he climbed onto the roof of the playhouse - we had already moved some items thinking that would keep him safe but no he found another way up.

He eats playdoh despite repeatedly being told not to, climbs anything he can and doesn't seem to understand the meaning of no!!

Help!!

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Oh dear I do seem to be flying the additional needs flag this week...do you have concerns about his development? if so I guess I would suggest a referral asap. Otherwise keep a really close eye on him...praise for all the good behaviour and try not to react unless you have to and then do it in a VERY calm and quiet way...he may be doing this for attention, how do Dad/mum handle it

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He is fine developmentally if anything beyond his age - good language skills, social etcalthough does struggle a little with sharing but who doesn't at 2? Problem with referral is that our local authority have just 'sold out' their early years provision and the new provider is useless - there has even been mention that we will be charged if an advisor visits - although this has not been confirmed.

I don't think it is for attention - he just genuinely does not seem to see any danger in what he does. Mum and Dad are also at their wits end - bless them they were dreading parent's evening last night - scared of what we were going to say - how awful is that for a 2 yr old?

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Has he actually hurt himself? Are there opportunities for him to take risks safely? Swing, spin, climb, hang upside down, be squeezed? I have two a little bit like that and it really drives me nuts. And we have fences down so outside play is in other places at the moment which is very difficult, but the things I think will help them is to put a rope ladder on the swing frame (it's grassy so not too hard to land on). I'd also like a climbing wall but it's just too expensive at the moment. Big yoga balls are a hit for a bit of out of control rolling motion. Any possibility of moving your playhouse to a softer spot? Mine's just plastic and that's where mine will be after Easter fence fixing, and they can climb all day.

 

H

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To be honest my oldest child was very much like this!! He could climb like a monkey from the age of 18 months - we had a chair with our name on in A&E and were almost on first name terms with the staff! He was a nightmare, advanced developmentally but could not be still! I don't think he slept through the night until he was five! We used to move from one activity to the next before he went to school his favourite saying being "what are we doing next mummy?". He was and still is at 25 a thrill seeker!! The higher, faster, more dangerous the better! As parents we basically kept him as active as we possibly could - outside was our friend!! We spent weekends hiking, climbing trees, making go karts, riding bikes, kite flying - you name it we did it!! As a parent it is awful to see that look of dread on your friends faces when you arrive with your mini whirl wind - I genuinely feel for them.

 

As others have said active physical play, controlled risk - I would dedicate an adult to some sort of physical activity that will appeal to him both inside and outside - others will join too! HV for support at home too.

 

Incidentally my son is now a rock climbing mountain guide - I can't look at the photographs he takes without having an attack of jelly legs! He still cannot be still but is healthy and happy with his life choices - as a mum I couldn't be more proud!!

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Just wanted to add that a consistent approach both at home and within the setting - agree boundaries and strategies with parents so that you are all singing from the same hymn sheet!!

 

Good luck - he is very young and may well improve as his general understanding develops!! If not then you will have observations to support any additional support that may be required!!

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To be honest my oldest child was very much like this!! He could climb like a monkey from the age of 18 months - we had a chair with our name on in A&E and were almost on first name terms with the staff! He was a nightmare, advanced developmentally but could not be still! I don't think he slept through the night until he was five! We used to move from one activity to the next before he went to school his favourite saying being "what are we doing next mummy?". He was and still is at 25 a thrill seeker!! The higher, faster, more dangerous the better! As parents we basically kept him as active as we possibly could - outside was our friend!! We spent weekends hiking, climbing trees, making go karts, riding bikes, kite flying - you name it we did it!! As a parent it is awful to see that look of dread on your friends faces when you arrive with your mini whirl wind - I genuinely feel for them.

 

As others have said active physical play, controlled risk - I would dedicate an adult to some sort of physical activity that will appeal to him both inside and outside - others will join too! HV for support at home too.

 

Incidentally my son is now a rock climbing mountain guide - I can't look at the photographs he takes without having an attack of jelly legs! He still cannot be still but is healthy and happy with his life choices - as a mum I couldn't be more proud!!

Ancaster - that post was full of love. You can sense the pride you have in him without you even saying it at the end!

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