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Coeliac Risk Assesmemt


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Hi we have a child that has recently started with us , who has coeliac disease, please can you let me know if any of you have a risk assessment for a child with this or similar condition in your setting.

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I'm sorry I can't help with a risk assessment but you might find one of the downloads on this page useful.

https://www.coeliac.org.uk/gluten-free-diet-and-lifestyle/school-meals/

 

I do know that it is crucially important that you ensure that not a trace of gluten is allowed to contaminate the child's food as, even if it doesn't trigger symptoms, even miniscule amounts can have serious long term health implications.

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Speaking as a coeliac, I would suggest that whatever you put in place, do it in consultation with the child's parents. They will be stressed to the max at leaving their child with anybody else.

 

I'm a really sensitive coeliac, and I could not eat a gluten free cake in a cafe if it was stored in the cabinet below gluten containing cakes, because the risk of cross contamination from dropped crumbs is too high. There should be separate chopping boards, tongs, oven gloves, baking trays, etc for handling gf food, and these should be washed in different washing up water with different cloths and towels. (Or done first) Anyone handling gf food should have gloves on, that are new on, and cannot have come in contact with any work surfaces or airborne contaminants, such as flour particles from baking elsewhere in the room.

 

All labels need to be checked, and double checked. I have an app on my smartphone that checks barcodes with the database at Coeliac Uk and tells me if it's safe or not. Be aware that just because gluten isn't mentioned in the ingredients, it doesn't mean it's guaranteed gluten free - walkers crisps and cadburys chocolate are a case in point.

 

But, like I say, get the parents on board - they are the ones who need reassurance.

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Luckily my husband is gf too, so that makes catering sooooo much simpler at home. We rarely eat out, and when we do, we aren't relaxed, because it's not a fun, relaxing experience. We've been excited to find that our new local chippy will do us gluten free fish and chips on a Friday when he has the extra fryer on. That has its own set of implements and warming oven etc. and the oil is not contaminated from frying gluten batter in. He doesn't cook them in advance, he waits for us to come in so we can watch him cook them, so we are happy. What a star!

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No I can understand that eating out must be fraught with worry for you both. Great about the fish and chips!! Really have to confess I know very little about the condition, have you always suffered with it or is it something you can just become intolerant to?

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It's an inherited autoimmune disease. You are born with it, but often people have it and don't know. My symptoms only started about fifteen years ago, when I had tests to find out why I was always tired and anaemic. I didn't know I couldn't have gluten, and at first, after diagnosis, I could still eat it occasionally, and only suffer tiredness and a bit of bloating. As the years have gone on, I've got more sensitive.

Since I've been totally gluten free I've never been anaemic, don't get mouth ulcers all the time, and my joints don't ache constantly. It's been totally worth it!

What happens is that the proteins in gluten attack the villi, the finger-like projections in the intestine which absorb the nutrients from the food we eat. Removing gluten from the diet allows these villi to heal and do their job. Left without treating it can cause osteoporosis and/ or bowel cancer.

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It's an inherited autoimmune disease. You are born with it, but often people have it and don't know. My symptoms only started about fifteen years ago, when I had tests to find out why I was always tired and anaemic. I didn't know I couldn't have gluten, and at first, after diagnosis, I could still eat it occasionally, and only suffer tiredness and a bit of bloating. As the years have gone on, I've got more sensitive.

Since I've been totally gluten free I've never been anaemic, don't get mouth ulcers all the time, and my joints don't ache constantly. It's been totally worth it!

What happens is that the proteins in gluten attack the villi, the finger-like projections in the intestine which absorb the nutrients from the food we eat. Removing gluten from the diet allows these villi to heal and do their job. Left without treating it can cause osteoporosis and/ or bowel cancer.

This is really informative Cait, thank you. Keep up the good work, I love reading your posts :-)

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This is really informative Cait, thank you. Keep up the good work, I love reading your posts :-)

Thank you. A big welcome to the forum from us all. You'll soon be addicted and find yourself having to check for new posts on here constantly! I look forward to reading yours in the future.

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