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Plymouth Brethren


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I have a boy joining my new class who is Plymouth Brethren and wondered if anyone else has had experience of teaching children of this faith before. I know there are some fairly strict rules about meals etc. Any info would be most welcome. Thanks. x

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My mother was brought up in a similar tradition. Although my connections will be vastly out of date - my dear mother long since passed and she having returned to the established church in about 1938 - I expect mirrors and dressing up might be problematic. Avoiding vanity was a big part of her up-bringing. So self-image work may need re-thinking. Instead of looking in a mirror to draw their faces, maybe talking factually about their features, or draw each other's faces. And maybe there will be issues around 'pride'. When we say, 'Wow, you must feel very proud', this might be construed as a negative. A quick google hasn't supported these points so don't take my word as gospel.

 

Honey

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Hi incuspo, are you able to talk with the family about their beliefs and what they can/cant do. We had a family many years ago, and they didn't use TV, radio, or participate in music or outings. (so computers, etc could be an issue maybe?) But I would imagine, like with many religious groups, that there will be varieties even within the group, and so the family are the best source for this information. That way you can work around any potential issues.

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I taught in a school where we had 4 Plymouth brethren families at separate times.

The parents were very specific with their requirements and we all had a copy of this in the register and in the class handover book so everyone was aware, we worked hard to accommodate them (which may have been why we had 3 families come to the school after the first family)

The children would have separate snack time, for the tinies they were a bit looser with things like drinks. They were picked up for lunch each day but on occasion would stay and have a separate table.They would not be present for any religious education work. They were allowed to use technology if it was an aid to their education so computers and electronic devices were fine but no TV or radio. They weren't allowed to read certain books like one boy who was a year 6 wasn't allowed to read Harry Potter (in fact I know some Christians who believe HP and the vampire books to be work of the devil) the children would go on outings but one of the ones would accompany them and would take them off for lunch separately. Like Mundia says its best to ask them for their specific needs as they can vary from family to family. We had one mum who was quite laid back with some things and another who was very strict.

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