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Understanding danger


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Hi all, I'm looking for some advice from you wonderful, knowledgeable lot about a child who seems to have no concept of danger or personal safety. For example, we have a fence around our outside play area on a public playing field and despite constant reminders, he insists on putting his hands through to dogs people walk on the field, at home Mum told him not to touch the iron and when he asked why, said it was hot, upon which he promptly touched it, burning his fingers! If we ask him not to do something he will do it anyway - not with that quick look most children will do to see if we are watching, but just as if he hasn't heard - even if we've got right down to his level and made sure we have his attention! Mum is having his hearing checked, but we're all worried that it's something other than hearing. Any ideas?

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Most definitely! He just can't seem to resist touching, experimenting and exploring. If there is something that shouldn't be fiddled with, he will fiddle! We have no concerns otherwise, his speech and language is fantastic, self-care is great (although he managed to injure himself by leaning across the toilet today to flush it and slipped over, bumping his eye on the seat!), he struggles a little socially, but loves younger children - perhaps a bit too much, and he's very affectionate towards staff. Mum say's she's at her wits end at home and feels she's constantly shouting at him to stop just to keep him safe - hard work with a 2 year old as well.

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hmmm, its a difficult one. I suspect I could guess the way this might go in the longer run. I guess you could make a paediatric referral, but suspect that the child's age would be considered too young for any kind of diagnostic analysis.

 

Frankly sounds like my son at the same age...did eventually get a diagnosis but not until aged nearly 6.

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We're going to have a sit down talk with Mum I think and try to pinpoint just what he's up to at home. We're obviously trying very hard not to jump to any conclusions at this stage, but we want to have built up a better picture by September so that we can get wheels in motion if we need to.

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Sounds like some social stories might be helpful. Also, could you put up some simple signs on the fence as a visual reminder about not putting hands through? This could be done in other areas which may be a problem too.

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I agree finleysmaid, he was at our toddler group yesterday, and although he looked at me and I spoke to him, didn't actually focus on me until I got right down to his level and got his full attention - then he looked surprised to see me! Possibly hearing based, but he has a habit of looking right through people before realising they are there, almost as if it takes a while for him to process - difficult to explain really, but it's just a bit odd. He's got lots of quirks and mannerisms that have always seemed just part of his personality and age related, but they've not changed - he was the only child who came to introduce himself to a reception teacher visiting, something he does with all visitors (and members of the public passing by on the field). We just thought he was very self-confident, but that doesn't fit with other behaviours.

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That's definitely somewhere in the back of our minds along with ADHD/ADD, but we're trying to be very careful as my colleague has a son with asd who came to us so we are worried we're being a bit super sensitive.

 

I think some more focused obs are required by his keyperson and his mum alongside his hearing test. He's staying with us for another year, but school comes round all too quickly and we know from past experience that getting other professionals involved is a long process!

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