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Dignity at work policy


Melba
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Last week we had an incident where a parent shouted at members of staff for 15 minutes because she felt it was acceptable for her to dictate which sessions we gave to which children.

This makes me feel that we could do with a dignity at work policy which would allow for removing sessions from a parent who abuses a member of staff in some way

Does anyone have anything like this?

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Would this not come into your behaviour policy which includes children and adults.

Our setting aims to provide a safe and secure environment in which everyone is respected.

Something like unacceptable behaviour such as shouting, swearing, racist comments, physical violence will not be tolerated in our setting to children or between adult to adult in any circumstances.

These actions are taken very seriously and may result in withdrawal of a child's space and or person/s being banned from the premises.

Hope this helps.:)

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After a bad incident between two parents nothing to do with us but the arguments occurred in pre school as it was a face to face meeting point we brought in a parent / setting contract which states that care will be removed. After the stress of the situation and how it impacted on us even though it was nothing to do with the setting I brought it in straight away as I'm not willing to put up with it ever again. we had it in put behaviour policy in which we could send them a letter pointing out unacceptable behaviour and it will not be tolerated but it did not address any sanctions such as removal of place within setting so now the contract does state this, it's signed so any issues we are covered to say bye bye. x

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Firstly, your policies are there to formally record how you would act in any given circumstance. It isn't the case that you can only act if you have it written into a policy prior to an incident. Clearly it is impossible to predict every event and have a policy to cover every eventuality.

 

Secondly, I'm not a fan of writing new policies to cover new situations as settings end up with far too many policies that no one ends up reading. Keep your policies broad so that they encompass many different situations and where possible adapt your existing policies if you think they don't cover an important area. Slightly changing the wording or adding in an extra sentence to a relevant policy may be all that's needed.

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We did end up with a parental agreement, that all signed when starting the setting, clearly stating things like this.. and fee payments (another bugbear) , outdoor play etc

It did include some things about the setting as well, hours open, reminders to pay, it mentioned confidentiality at all times, who to speak to with issues etc..

we had a copy on file and they had one to keep..

Made it easier to speak to some parents when they had been clearly told and signed an agreement to the terms when they started. it was in our policies, both safeguarding and behaviour , this just doubled up on information.

We felt the need when I had a parent shout at me , in front of the children and parents for no reason..the more I walked away the louder she got , staff intervened and removed her, had I tried we all felt she could have become physically violent.

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