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Gross motor skills


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I have been asked to provide more opportunities for gross motor development for my Reception children. I've been been given a smidgin of TA time to do this! However, I'm having a mental blank about what kind of thing I could be providing! I know, it's ridiculous and I'm feeling very stupid but I'm hoping you won't be laughing at me and can point me vaguely in the right direction!

Thank you!

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I'm not laughing I'm just wondering what gross motor skills you want to focus on?

My kids really like those sound tubes that you twirl in the air. I got some from Wilkinsons for £1. You could also have a look on pinterest for other peoples ideas.

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I'm not laughing I'm just wondering what gross motor skills you want to focus on?

My kids really like those sound tubes that you twirl in the air. I got some from Wilkinsons for £1. You could also have a look on pinterest for other peoples ideas.

I think that's my problem - I feel like I've completely lost a sense of what constitutes 'gross motor' - I've had so many conversations about it recently I'm no longer sure which way is up! Thanks for your suggestions and link - great starting point!

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maybe think about it in terms of whole body (hopping/skipping/jumping/swinging/spinning)

then part body stuff....shoulder movements/elbow/wrist movements/ankle /calf/ knee/ hips

Sort of random thinking there ...just wondering whether thinking of a body part or function may be the way to look at it (IYSWIM)

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Hi,

I would class gross motor as anything working the larger muscles - bigger movements basically. We use a small climbing frame, moving on hands and feet across the floor or tyres, moving along benches in different ways - using different body parts to pull or push, rolling tyres, using chalk to make big rainbows, lines and circles on the floor then as high as they can reach up the wall, dancing ribbons, basket ball, throwing and catching, movement dances (sticky kids & tumble tots), obstacle courses, skittles and beanbag target games. I'm sure they're others that I haven't mentioned.

Good luck x

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Have you thought about dough disco? Have a look at Shonette Bason (link below) - it's great fun, lasts for only 3'44" and the children love it!

Once they have learned the 'moves' you can do it with any favourite music with a good beat; it could be done immediately after p.m. register to help settle the children - it has had a marked effect on the writing skills of some of my little ones.

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Have you thought about dough disco? Have a look at Shonette Bason (link below) - it's great fun, lasts for only 3'44" and the children love it!

Once they have learned the 'moves' you can do it with any favourite music with a good beat; it could be done immediately after p.m. register to help settle the children - it has had a marked effect on the writing skills of some of my little ones.

I can't imagine the staff let alone the children doing this - how reluctant are they in the beginning?

I have a vision of it just being big ole me in the corner! xD

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We have a large circle of elastic that is covered in soft material and do gross motor games with this, we have ribbon sticks and ribbon rings which we got with our Active kids vouchers. We use our parachute quite a lot, but I do need to learn some new ideas for this. We have the rainbow stepping stones for balance and these form a big part of any obstacle course we set up. We also use Tumble tots CDs. In the past a member of staff also used yoga cards with the kids which were good.

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I can't imagine the staff let alone the children doing this - how reluctant are they in the beginning?

I have a vision of it just being big ole me in the corner! xD

I usually have a small group of 6-8 children and we use the 'quiet room' (only because that's where the IWB is situated) - all the children are eager to join in and I usually make sure I have 2 or 3 confident ones to to act as the lead learner; and once you have learned the various 'moves' you can use other music - the favourite at the moment is One Direction (Live while we're young).

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Doesn't good outdoor provision which is available through free flow provide all the gross motor development children require??

Cx

Children love anything that is just a bit 'different'! :1b

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We've had a big focus on gross motor activities as all the research says how children need to develop their core muscles before being able to even contemplate holding a pencil. One of the most popular activities we've introduced has been Pirate Writing. I bought 6 foam swords from Poundland and the children go in groups to sky write with the swords. (I kept it to 6 as knew my current cohort would just end up hitting each other with the swords.)

The children love it and with the big movements it really helps to strengthen the shoulder and elbow pivot.

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I have two inexperienced members of staff who are really hung up on trying to get the children to write (not even mark make) at too young an age and ability. I am constantly reminding them of the importance of building gross muscles first. I had a brilliant explanation once which likened the process to a cake but I can't quite remember it correctly! I really am going to have to send them on training as I seem to be banging my head against a brick wall!!

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Doesn't good outdoor provision which is available through free flow provide all the gross motor development children require??

Cx

I think that was the issue - my free flow outdoor provision isn't good! It doesn't really provide enough opportunities for gross motor development. I have 2 outdoor spaces - one large with a climbing frame, plants and crates for balancing etc, space to use bikes and trikes although the majority is a bog most of the year (and I really do mean bog - I'm not just been a wuss about a bit of mud - you sink into it). However, although directly outside it this is 'round the corner' from my classroom and I can't free flow to it and I simply don't have the adults available to get out there very regularly. My second space is immediately behind the classroom and I can see/hear it wherever I am so we can (and do) free flow to it but it's tiny - maybe 1.5-2m wide by about 6-7m long. There simply isn't the space in it to climb/run etc. So, we've been looking at TA provision to try and give me a second adult who specifically takes children outside to do gross motor work.

I feel like I'm making excuses - I'm not intending to, just trying to explain why things are the way they are but also trying to do something about it. This was also the reason behind my thread about thinking outside the box and the need to start with a blank slate.

Thanks everyone for your suggestions, really helpful and I very much appreciate it.

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We don't have a hall!! As I have Y1s I do do 2 PE lessons each week which YR join with - we're doing gymnastics (balancing and travelling) in the village hall at the moment and on Friday I have a 'don't have to get changed' PE lesson which is always outside no matter what where we've done things like skipping, and various ABC work.

My plan for the moment is to get whichever TA I'm given to take them out to have the run/ride of the playground. Even if they're only out there for ten minutes it will be better than nothing. The other part of the thinking behind the plan is that taken even just 6 YR children out will have a big impact on noise levels/interruptions for me doing inputs for the Y1s.

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Blimey - a school with no hall?!! In my last school we had 3! (It was a Victorian triple decker though!!)

Cx

Show off! ;)

It is the bane of our life - 5 minute walk down the road to do indoor PE and you have to take a second adult as part of the risk assessment which given our shortage of TAs is a nightmare to manage. Not to mention the school dinners being served from my room. It does have upsides though - we go out in all weathers, because the prospect of wet play is hellish! I think we've given in to one wet lunch time this year. Also my children are superstars at setting up for the afternoon because I can't do it at lunch - every single table, my construction area, my making area cupboards and half the role play area are moved every day and rarely put back the way they should be, the servers are often finishing the hoovering as we come back into the room after lunch!

That sounds like moaning again and I'm not - it's just the way my school is but you can imagine I get a little disgruntled from time to time!

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