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UW - Talking about things they have observed.


green hippo
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little girl in garden finds a snail...describes it (size/colour /stripes on shell etc) then says it is called a wart snail and it has no feet. She and a practitioner go to find the tablet and look up snails...gets very excited when she realises it does have a foot,,,,,just one very big one!

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It's the sort of language to expect that I'm wondering whether I've got the right expectation for 30-50 months.

Currently, I want to see children showing interest in their environment and then talking about the colours, patterns, basic changes, textures, shapes, materials etc. Does that sound right? I find it easier when children are talking about something that has/is happening e.g. ice melting than if they are looking at a worm and saying "it's long and wriggling into the soil." However, with the worm the child is still showing interest in the animal and describing it and what it is doing??

If children like looking at this through a magnifying glass but don't talk about them with questioning or prompting, I would say that they are working below the 30-50 months age and stage?

Thanks for all your replies,

Green Hippo x

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If children like looking at this through a magnifying glass but don't talk about them with questioning or prompting, I would say that they are working below the 30-50 months age and stage?

I would say the same, calling it 'explores their environment'. Next: 'talks about things they have observed in their environment'. Then 'seeks knowledge about features of their environment'.

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It's the sort of language to expect that I'm wondering whether I've got the right expectation for 30-50 months.

Currently, I want to see children showing interest in their environment and then talking about the colours, patterns, basic changes, textures, shapes, materials etc. Does that sound right? I find it easier when children are talking about something that has/is happening e.g. ice melting than if they are looking at a worm and saying "it's long and wriggling into the soil." However, with the worm the child is still showing interest in the animal and describing it and what it is doing??

If children like looking at this through a magnifying glass but don't talk about them with questioning or prompting, I would say that they are working below the 30-50 months age and stage?

Thanks for all your replies,

Green Hippo x

i think exploring and talking about their observations. no particular language needed! the statement that leads into it is

  • notices detailed features of objects in their environment, which i feel does not involve talk, just observing. so looking at the conkers/leaves on the Autumn display, and showing some interest, e.g. feeling them/turning them over to look at them closely etc

if they described them e.g. they're hard, smooth, bumpy etc or the shells are spiky i would say they are achieving 30-50 statement

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