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cursive writing in Reception


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Our local school uses it. The head made the decision 'because it looks neater and helps with joined up writing later on' and the rest of the school had to go with it. All staff have to use it in any correspondance too. ( I don't like it, it makes every child's writing look the same, there is no 'character' to it, but as i don't have children there any more, i can't say anything

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Hi Kazz

 

I have taught both ways and prefer to teach cursive from the beginning. The children who learn to write print form find it very challenging to then learn a different way.

 

I begin by teaching that the print form is for reading and the school way (cursive) is for writing. During my phonic lessons I show flashcards in both cursive and print and the children quickly learn to recognise them. Writing them appears to take a little longer but my most able are usually beginning to join up words before leaving reception!

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Some pros and cons:

Children only have to learn one style of handwriting, not two as they would if starting with print.

As joined letters are produced in a flowing movement, with all beginning in the same place, a physical memory of how each letter is written develops. This reduces the likeli­hood of reversal mix-ups such as b/d.

It also helps to fix spellings more firmly in the memory because words are formed as a continuous movement. This includes the spelling of irregular words which need to be remembered as wholes.

The flow of joined up writing helps to develop speed and fluidity as the pencil does not leave the paper until the word is completed.

The disadvantages are that letters that are joined can look quite different from printed letters in books and that writing, in the early stages, can look messy.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi,

 

We have just started teaching fully cursive handwriting this year. As the above posts have stated, I still use both cursive and non cursive letters when teaching children the initial sounds as our reading books do not contain cursive print. Again, we teach them that when reading they will see the non cursive letters but when we write we use the cursive format to make our writing neater and quicker. This is the website we use, which the children are really enjoying, and it is also free!! The resources are lovely too.

http://www.teachhandwriting.co.uk/more-activities-help-develop-handwriting-skills.html

 

Lots x

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of course in a few years time we might not be teaching writing at all with IT systems coming in to schools! we spend so much time teaching this but when they go on to senior school they now (from the experience of my two) hardly write at all . Nearly everything is done on laptop which has been a huge advantage for my daughter with dyslexia of course

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