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Hello, I have a girl in my setting who likes the outside area and is often making things out of twigs. she has made a family out of twigs and becomes very engaged with them (the twigs are very small in size) she will whisper to them and put them together 'kiss mummy', she plays alone. yesterday she came up to me and said "look a circle', she had made a circle shape out of a small twig. where would I take this as next steps?

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Guest Spiral

Could she use the twigs to build a home for teddy?

 

You could show her the bear and ask her if she could make a home for him as he is needing some shelter outside..develop further by asking her how to keep the rain out/sun off of him, where would the garden be, what could he plant (could you use cress to make a garden within a couple of days?

 

Just a thought, spiral :-)

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Lovely! :1b

Depends really on which sort of 'Next Step' she needs........do you offer materials indoors for heuristic play - wood shavings, twigs, shells, pebbles that sort of thing - could be exciting to watch what she does with that - (to be truly 'proper' there wouldn't be any adult input) :1b

'Truly proper' - my grammar just gets better and betterer ;)xDxD

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ooo that's so lovely :-)

 

She seems to be doing a great job moving things on, on her own and gardens tend to have a lot of 'loose parts' so I'd be tempted to leave her be for now and see what the next couple of sessions brings

on the flipside; Stick-man book to take home (possibly with some 'crafty' bits and bobs to make her own)

Natural art pictures from mixing up mud as the 'glue' and using leaves etc to make pictures

Ask parents to collect driftwood and other random bits for a 'loose parts' session

 

What are her identified next learning steps?

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Thanks, i have ordered the Stick Man book, I think she will love that. Today we made rafts out of twigs and sticks tied together with pipe cleaners, she enjoyed seeing how many toys she could fit on the raft before it sank, she was happy to share the activity with another child.

 

Recently I have spoken to this girls mother and mentioned that although she does play with friends, she occasionally likes to play alone, the mother agreed with me and said she had noticed this herself. the problem is , that the mother mentioned this to another member of staff and asked if her daughter had 'played alone' today. the other member of staff has said to me that I shouldn't mention if a child tends to play alone, as all parents want their children to be sociable. I am now confused because surely it is our job to be honest in case there are issues such as SEN, I mentioned this and was told 'to do what I liked' can any one offer help on this matter?

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I saw a lovely activity on twitter with leaves. Use a hole punch to make holes and then do threading :) If you're concerned about her playing alone, could you match her with a buddy to collect leaves, twigs etc, make stories up? How old is she? Playing alone isn't uncommon :)

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hi, she will be going up to school this September. she is very bright and I am not concerned about her. i just think that the other girls at the setting are not on her wave length, if anything she prefers to play with boys. her mother is Italian and her father french, maybe its a culture thing:) I sometimes think the more intelligent children tend to be happy with their own thoughts. Thanks for the activity tip Rea.

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