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Independent writing in reception


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Hi

I am NQT and New to EYFS. I need help and ideas of how I can teach and help my reception children to write simple words and sentences independently.

 

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We have an invisible monster that makes a mess - takes toys and is generally a pain. The children love leaving notes for him, making signs especially if he has done something really shocking!

We've also had lots of success with pretty resources and setting them up for use - colourful pens, strange pencils, writing pads, clip boards, squared paper, post-it notes, roll a paints, shaving foam, water painting, with an adult modelling how to use them in a casual way even boys like to use them.

But it usually starts with an exciting idea that gives them a premise and reason to write- it makes them more purposeful. Especially if you can take them around the school and share their writing with older children- signs to tell them to watch out for a naughty dangerous monster that has escaped!

Hope this helps!

x

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Thank you wildflowers, I use your ideas for each topic and the children enjoy using them when it is adult led or an adult is there to support them. When an adult is there to support them they will use good letter formation and try to spell using their phonic knowledge but when an adult isn't there they just draw zig zag lines and choose not to use the prompts all around them.

 

Thank you ninabeana I shall try your ideas out.

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Children will often have different levels of outcomes when working with an adult, it's quite normal! (the zone of proximal development).

Ideas:

  • A rich writing environment and reasons to write...a writing area with lots of different writing tools, papers, envelopes...
  • Sustained shared activity where the adult scribes with the children's input and vice versa.
  • Lots of writing tools inside and outside in all the different areas e.g. clipboards and paper in the construction area
  • Require them to write a label/caption for models etc and have a dedicated display space for their work so captions have a purpose. Same with paintings etc.
  • Teach them different ways to make simple folded books from paper - in my experience this was always successful!

 

Cx

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I sometimes try to pick a couple of children to focus on making suggestions for how they could write. E.g. I had a boy the other day who was trying to make a "multicoloured telescope" He was getting stuck and we were talking through what he was trying to do. I suggested that he draw a design for it in his have a go book (a blank A4 exercise book that all the children have for doing their own thing in - great for getting some examples of independent writing). I then asked if he had everything he needed and when we didn't suggested he make a list of the things he wanted then he could go to the office to ask for help to get those things from the staff room.

We made a skateboard park out of blocks once, we knew it would have to be broken up so I got a large piece of paper and we started drawing a map, children started adding their own contributions then I suggested adding a labels so that if someone else wanted to use the map they were really clear about what we were doing.

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  • 2 months later...
Guest tinkerbell

Class tick lists are popular in my class and clip boards.

I am also using challenge cards with suggestions for writing eg how many cockroaches in the mud? Write your answer and put it in Gordon's mouth. ( mud is cocoa flavoured playdough,plastic cockroaches and post it's with pencil....Gordon is the IKEA bed bug we call him a wood louse who,has a zip mouth and is used for all manner of,things)

Chalk outside is also popular at the moment and the children have been drawing treasure maps with instructions! I have rolls,of wallpaper which they also love or draw and write on.

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