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Is your setting a registered charity?


klc106
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Hi

Are any of you running pre-schools that are registered charities?

If so, what does it involve? and what are the benefits of being registered?

At the moment I own my pre-school as a sole trader and employ my staff. We are looking at becoming a charity as we have been told we would be able to apply for more grants etc.

But I would like to know what it involves as its taken a long time for me to get the business where it is now.

I have tried looking on the internet but it all seems a bit confusing! :(

Thanks :1b

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We're a charity. Grants might still be dependant on other stuff so check that too. Our LA had funding for grants, but settings like ours in rented hall couldn't apply because we couldn't fulfill their rule that we be in the setting for upto 25 years depending on the amount. Childminders couldn't apply for the same reason. I'm not sure what the benefits are as a charity, we can fundraise outside the setting if we get a lottery licence, our business account gives no bank charges.

I'd talk to your accountant to get the details.

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we are a charity but are run by trustees (you will get less benefit from being a sole trader) you need to register with the charities commission (when we first did this we received a grant from them). We need to do an annual return but we do masses of grant fundraising which we can only do as a registered charity. (we got nearly £4000 in grants last year) but we do run on a not for profit basis (so all the profits are ploughed back into the buisness) for us it has been a huge benefit

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Thanks finleysmaid. I was looking at changing to be run my trustees in order to get more benefit.

What is the role of the trustees exactly?

Who can be a trustee?

Would the pre-school be theirs or would it still be my setting overall?

Also, how much say would I have in decision making?

 

Sorry for all the questions, I'm just so confused! :(

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We are a registered Charity - always have been 47 years+

I agree with Rea - it doesn't always help with getting grants and funding - we've only ever been successful with 1 application and that was from our own local parish councillor. Think it's more to do with your area, rather than if you are a charity, perhaps?

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We are a registered Charity - always have been 47 years+

I agree with Rea - it doesn't always help with getting grants and funding - we've only ever been successful with 1 application and that was from our own local parish councillor. Think it's more to do with your area, rather than if you are a charity, perhaps?

if you wants some tips thumperrabbit i'm getting quite good!!

 

In our case KLC the trustees are the directors of the limited company...so the company is theirs. The trustees are my strategic team so they plan for the big things (under my guidance) so major building work /planning for the future/ financial planning etc. They also act as a safeguard for the finance...so we have some control but they have the final say so that none of us can defraud the company

Anyone can become a trustee as long as they are an upstanding member of the community and able to gain a dbs (so yjust like governors in school and they can hold their position for years.

I don't know if you could still 'own' the company...that would be a question for your accountant i suspect. Most decisions are made by me but some i ratify through the committee...so large expenditure etc

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if you wants some tips thumperrabbit i'm getting quite good!!

 

 

I'm all ears Finleysmaid :1b I feel a new thread coming on?!

We are in a VERY affluent area - not that it stops parents only having 1 session until they are funded :(

Our 1 grant given as I said was from our local parish councillor who as staff we all know very well!!

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I'm all ears Finleysmaid :1b I feel a new thread coming on?!

We are in a VERY affluent area - not that it stops parents only having 1 session until they are funded :(

Our 1 grant given as I said was from our local parish councillor who as staff we all know very well!!

I hear you thumperrabbit but i'm working on a broken computer at the moment and can't seem to start new threads! the bottom third of my screen is not useable and i'm guessing where buttons are! xD so if you start it i'll follow!!

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Some time ago I worked in a private nursery and the owner wanted to change to being a charity. The accountant said it was not possible to do this with the same management as the Charity Commission would not allow it. I don't know why not

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Hi,

My pre-school used to be a registered charity, that needed a board of trustees (usually parents), however under charity commission rules 'you' as a manager or sole trader of your pre-school cannot sit on the committee as you presumably take a wage from the pre-school.

We converted to a 'Community Interest Company' (CIC). We run as a social enterprise CIC and are a registered company, but under CIC rules you as a paid employee can sit on the governing committee (as you still need a committee) as a director but can still take a salary.

This would make you an 'employee' of the company however everything can still be managed by you and your committee. We only have a committee of four people and we can still raise funds and apply for grants pretty much the same as a registered charity.

 

 

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CIC here too having converted from a charity. Charity and committee = stress! No parents wanted to join committee as massive responsibilities that really most have no knowledge or understand about at all

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