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Glass containers in reception classroom?


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I'm wanting to revamp my making/creative area as it's looking tired, tatty and uninviting. I'd like to put crayons/pencils etc into clear containers so that children can easily see what is in them. I'm finding at the moment that the smaller wax crayons are getting lost in the bottom of the pots we have and not used and then progressively get grubbier, tattier and even more uninviting!

 

The only thing I've come across which I think would work is clear plastic cups but they are very unstable and I can see ending up everywhere! My other thought is using some wide necked jam jars I have. I think the extra weight would make them steadier.

What do other people think?

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A little aside, I melted all my broken crayons down in paper petit four(?) cases to make lovely two-coloured sweetie sized crayons for outside use. Really good for my little ones who aren't ready to hold a pencil yet.

There are also the glass Gu pudding dishes which are wide enough to get a little hand into without being very deep.

 

H

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I use real materials all the time and this is with 2.5 yrs plus! we have real china and glass jars. I have lots of small pots from ikea with twist on lids that we use for paint. It is VERY rare for the children to break these items (yes they are risk assesssed) in fact the only breakage this term has been from me!

The other thing that you might like to look at are the small metal buckets (often for flower arranging) they are great as they have a handle (waitrose's ones are on special offer at the mo!)...though obviously they are not transparent!! :P

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Yes we use glass and china too, including jam jars, little glass bowls for paint mixing, a glass jar for displaying shells and other interesting things. We do have some breakages, but not too many and I think it's mostly because we have a vinyl covered concrete floor.

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There are also the glass Gu pudding dishes which are wide enough to get a little hand into without being very deep.

 

 

I like the sound of that...especially as you'd have to eat the Gu puddings in order to get the glass pots! ;) :1b

Edited by Beehive
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Thanks everyone, you've reassured me. I think I also want a feeling of it being special because it's a material that children are often not allowed to handle.

 

Finleysmaid - when you did your risk assessment what kind of thing did you put in? I'm thinking about saying these containers couldn't be taken outside. Mainly because of the difficulty in finding/clearing up if there were any breakages!

Beehive/Honeypancakes - I love the idea of having to eat lots of pudding just to get essential classroom resources! I actually also have a set of small terracotta pots which held puddings at some point. A friend collected them then gave them to me because she couldn't bear to throw them away. I've never yet found a use for them!

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The other thing that you might like to look at are the small metal buckets (often for flower arranging) they are great as they have a handle (waitrose's ones are on special offer at the mo!)...though obviously they are not transparent!! :P

 

You've just reminded me that I have some small plastic buckets with lids (originally held yogurt and yes I did buy the yogurt for the bucket but it tasted lovely too!) they would be perfect for outdoor crayon containers. I really need to start using up some of the stashes of useful containers I've collected over the years!

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actually your right we dont let them in the garden but i'm not sure that's on there! (will have to add) our risk assessment includes benefits (using real items/respect/learning about materials properties etc) then the hazards breakages/cuts on breaks. Then controls (training/teaching understanding of what will happen/use of carpets to minimise impact etc)

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I was anxious at the thought if using glass jars/ china plates in my nursery home corner,but after the children had been briefed about these fragile materials they have been so careful with them, and there isn't a broken item yet! I think sometimes we need to have a little more faith in our little ones! :-)

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actually your right we dont let them in the garden but i'm not sure that's on there! (will have to add) our risk assessment includes benefits (using real items/respect/learning about materials properties etc) then the hazards breakages/cuts on breaks. Then controls (training/teaching understanding of what will happen/use of carpets to minimise impact etc)

Thanks for this, will get writing and present my HT with a fait accompli! I want to start having a wood workshop too so need to write one for that as well.

Edited by HelenD26
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Thanks for this, will get writing and present my HT with a fait accompli! I want to start having a wood workshop too so need to write one for that as well.

ah im working on that one too....if you have a forest school near you they might give you a copy of theirs to get you going...can't scan at the mo or i could send you what i've got!

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