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Children not talking during observations


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Hi, all I had an NQT obs today which went really well one point my head made was that my children are not very talkative they don't discuss, the language is just "transactional" she said. The children seemed monosyllabic even when I asked them good questions, these are 4 and 5 years olds, I have 10 and only 2 of them will talk purposfully when asked, is this usual? Does anyone have any advise to tackle this in my future planning? Thanks x

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Depends what you're asking and how the questions are phrased. We're in playgroup so our children are a bit younger but if they're engrossed in something they wont necessarily respond to whats going on. Questions linked to something they're familiar with usually get a better response and then we match it to what they're doing. Do they know they're being observed? Are they feeling the pressure of the questions and dont want to get it wrong?

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OK thank u thinking back I think it was becasue they were engrossed! It was new to them, maybe a bit of pressure too so I don't think its anything to worry about I have never worried about their talk. It is just when Ofsted and other vistitors come in and ask questions of the children (we are an RI school) they often don't give the responses they are looking for. For example I had an odd one out of plants on display, when a child was asked by observer which was the odd one out the child just said "that one, its dead", I was just wondering if anyone else had tackled this and how I can plan/teach thinking and talking critically? xx

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For example I had an odd one out of plants on display, when a child was asked by observer which was the odd one out the child just said "that one, its dead", I was just wondering if anyone else had tackled this and how I can plan/teach thinking and talking critically? xx

 

To be honest, it's a pretty closed question to which the child gave more information than they really might feel was needed - "this one" would have sufficed as an answer!!

 

Try language activities that provide opportunities for scaffolding language such as using small world figures to co-construct a well known story for example.

 

Cx

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'....ask children questions to help you understand and not question to test their understanding'..... a tip that someone shared with me when I was bent on - 'what colour is this' 'what number is that' ...etc etc! xD

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Guest tinkerbell

I've had children like this in class. Perhaps some activities to stimulate language and thinking .eg

I used old calendars the ones with big pictures that parents send in in the new year and the double spread pictures you sometimes get in the newspapers. When the children come in after lunch have one stuck on the board for them to look at and then ask questions. .what do you see? how does it make you feel? why? what if?

I have a lovely picture book called 'what if? 'which has a picture on one side and a question on the other eg What have you taken home from a holiday? where is your favourite place? are you scared of the dark? do you believe in fairies?

my class love these activities and we have had some great discussions .

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