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Peace at Last by Jill Murphy - Help Needed ASAP


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Hi All,

 

I am being observed for 30 minutes. I am doing Peace at Last by Jill Murphy for my Reception class.

 

How should I go about it? What adult led activities can I do?

 

Any help will be appreciated.

 

Thanks you!

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Ah......... Peace at Last is my favourite of all books!!

 

Could the questioning be about the sounds Mr Bear heard in the story (so recall) and what other sounds he might hear in the various rooms and outside?

 

Sorry I am from nursery so not sure exactly . . . . . . .

 

Questions about how Mr Bear was feeling? How being tired makes the children feel? What do threy do to help themselves get off to sleep?

 

Will think on. . . . . .

 

Good luck though x

Edited by Scarlettangel
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The focus of the lesson is questioning.

Please help.

What other sounds might you hear in the kitchen ... garden ... etc?

 

Start with a very large question mark written on the whiteboard.

"What is it? When might we see this? We ask Qs when we want to find out more. What questions would you like to ask about the story?" [e.g. What is the book about? What is the title? Who is the author? or perhaps Qs more pertinent to the story - Why was Mr Bear tired at the end of the story? What might be in the envelope? etc]

Now turn to your talking partners/friend next to you - can you think of a question to ask him/her about the story?"

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Could you go on a listening walk and children (with partner) record (words or pictures) what they hear in a list format "What can you hear?"

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how about bringing in a couple of duvets...get the children to sleep under them...what can they hear? (letters and sounds links) then maybe give them some question words (how/why/ what/when) can they think of some things to ask Daddy bear or the animals or ???

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well a low level would be knowledge/recall which is just: what happened, who are the characters what's an author. whereas questions that involve greater levels of thinking get children to analyze or evaluate what they think. So asking why would Mr Bear be cross, or what could Mr Bear do to get a good nights sleep, bring higher levels of thinking to the actvity.

 

Bloom's Taxonomy is what I base my questioning thinking on.

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How about asking what the time is? There are lots of pictures showing a clock. I always ask how many owls there are too, as the story says 'too- whit, too- woo'.

 

I sometimes do an observational thing to get children to really look at the picture. Really only works if you have a smallish group, one page per child. I see something in the picture and say something like ' Suzie, can you see a number 8 in the picture?' And she comes to look. That's generally pertinent to something I'm wanting to see for a child

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I've remembered another way I organise questions - on the back of Cait's looking at pictures you can have "right there" questions where the answer will be something that can be seen, such as who's in the picture, and "think about" questions, where the answer isn't specifically signposted in the picture, e.g. why is there a clock in every picture or what did Mr Bear feel like when he saw everyonne was asleep, and so on.

 

Cx

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