Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

The first Ofsted Annual Lecture on Early Years


Recommended Posts

Dear all

 

Just in case you haven't spotted this I attach a copy of The first Ofsted Annual Lecture on Early Years, that took place on the 3 December 2012 and was delivered by Sue Gregory HMI, National Director of Early Years.

 

The title of the lecture was;

 

Investing in their future: how do we ensure our children get the good quality early years provision they need if they and the country are to succeed in the future?

 

Annual_Early_Years_lecture_-_3_December_20121.pdf

 

It makes for interesting reading.

 

Sue

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Page 9 makes very interesting reading;

 

I would also ask as others have done, whether a 10-year timescale to fully implement Cathy Nutbrown’s changes signals a lack of urgency.

 

If it takes ten years to achieve a higher standard, we risk disadvantaging three more generations of babies that will pass through in that time. Or, put another way, a baby aged one in a setting at the moment will reach the end of primary school before the changes are fully implemented.

 

We cannot afford to wait that long.

 

And inevitably, if we want our early years workforce to be better qualified, we have to think about better pay. After all, if we’re serious about investing in a better qualified workforce we should pay more. Nursery staff wages often hover around the minimum and even a graduate early years professional earns only half a teacher’s salary.

 

In my view, paying more isn’t unattainable. If we fund better training and higher qualifications – and more quickly than over a period of ten years – maybe we wouldn’t need as high an adult/child ratio as we have now.

 

And as well as having a better qualified and paid workforce, it’s crucial that funding is better targeted

 

Universal provision hasn’t worked for all children. This is problematic but things are being done.

 

The current government is considering how funding can be targeted at the most vulnerable children and in the highest quality provision.

 

The CBI18 is calling for targeted structured childcare in areas where educational performance is low.

 

And Ofsted’s review of research for the Access and Achievement project is suggesting that if all low income children were to be enrolled in high quality early education programmes this could significantly close the gap in achievement.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just read Sue what an interesting read and i agreed with nearly all she said except higher quaified staff leading to a lower child ratio rate

 

thank for putting that on here and im gonna print for my staff to read

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dear all

 

Just in case you haven't spotted this I attach a copy of The first Ofsted Annual Lecture on Early Years, that took place on the 3 December 2012 and was delivered by Sue Gregory HMI, National Director of Early Years.

 

The title of the lecture was;

 

Investing in their future: how do we ensure our children get the good quality early years provision they need if they and the country are to succeed in the future?

 

Annual_Early_Years_lecture_-_3_December_20121.pdf

 

It makes for interesting reading.

 

Sue

Thankyou for the link Sue, I have seen news about this floating about not really read anything concrete in reagrds to it.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)