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One - One


sadie19
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We have a issue in our setting with 1-1 we now have 2 children who both need 1-1. At the moment the staff team are shareing the 1-1 but i wanted to ask for some advice. From my experience 1-1 always had to be the same person because the idea is for the child to build a relationship and bond with that child. can any1 tell me what they do in they settings or weather you know weather 1-1 should be shared or 1 person. Thank You

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we usually use two staff per child as feel this helps if one is absent/unwell as the child is still familiar with the other staff member. one of these would be the childs key person and the other would be chosen with the childs needs in mind. the keyperson would devleop an iep alongside the senco - working out how to help the child etc and discuss it with the other person sharing the 1:1 explaining what they wish to be done with the child. Both staff would write notes and the keyperson would use these to chart the childs progress and make notes on the iep.

we feel as a setting that it works well for us and for our staff and also if the child has significant needs it can be very tiring etc so the work load is then shared

hope that helps

x

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In our setting we have three children who have 1:1 - one of the children has a single 1:1 worker, another has 2 1:1 workers as staff working patterns mean that it could not be the same person each time. The third child has 4 1:1 workers as this child has to have a medical procedure undertaken regularly and four setting staff are trained to deliver the procedure to cover staff absences or illness as even if 1:1 worker has a cold they cannot administer the procedure.

 

These arrangements work well for us but we are a single room church hall setting so all the children are familiar with all of the staff team members. All 1:1 workers are however level 3 qualified as per our LAs conditions of funding.

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we share the load between 2 people - key worker and 1 other as it is tiring and also the key worker's other children will miss out as it can be very time consuming. also if key worker is off other person can take over.

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This year we have had 2 children one - to - one and we have shared it between the 4/5 staff in the room. This works with these children as they are emotionally and physically tiring to work with. Usually we have only 1 person doing one-to-one and I think especially for children on the Autistic Spectrum this works well

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Sadie i would say that it depends on the individual child and their needs. You don't say how old this child is, or what their specific needs are. If you feel that it would be better for this particular little one to have a single one to one then you would have to choose the staff member who does the same hours obviously, but this may not be the person best suited to help them. There are no firm rules (to my knowledge) about only having one person and as others have said this can be a huge challenge for a single member of staff if the childs behaviour or needs are demanding.

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Sadie I work in a team of 6 and we share the 1-1 between us (unless there are really good reasons for not doing so). This works well as we are a very tight knit team and work very closely. It allows staff to have some respite should the day be very challenging. It provides children with the ability to be adaptable with who they work with (not centric around one person). Of course age group and needs will affect whether this is always possible but we have had some very good successes with children who have ASD to this flexible approach (guided of course by the SENCO).

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