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Advice Please


littleanna
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Any ideas what to say to a family who do not want their daughter to play on a bike, scooter, climb etc as she has had far too 'many accidents' - in fact the last one involved falling from a scooter and grazing her cheek- which the family think is unacceptable ?

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Not sure what to say to parents, but I would be asking myself if there were any 'patterns' in her accidents?

 

Could there be an underlying problem with balance/sight etc............. or are the parents just precious, and she doesn't actually have that many?

 

 

xx

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Hi Littleanna not sure the age of the little girl, but all children fall over from time to time and parents do need to recognise that this is a normal part of learning for all children.

As time goes on they will beable to hopefully limit the risk for themselves.

Worth parents checking with a doctor or health professional if she is clearly doing it all the time.[ poor vision, mobility issues].

Silly question i know but do her shoes fit her properly. The reason i ask is that some of our parents have brought them to pre-school with excessively big plimsolls, doodles etc.

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Silly question i know but do her shoes fit her properly. The reason i ask is that some of our parents have brought them to pre-school with excessively big plimsolls, doodles etc.

 

Maybe not so silly, when my own boys were small I noticed that they quite often fell alot when they needed new shoes!

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I'm currently working on a safeguarding module - based on preventative measures that settings can employ to help children keep themselves safe. Part of this is building children's self-esteem/self-worth and the importance of resilience. part of my background reading has found:

 

That in striving to build up resilience in children it is vital that they have the opportunity to experience a variety of challenges that involve an element of risk. It is by becoming familiar with, and being able to assess levels of risk that children develop competence in being able to develop problem solving skills and make decisions and choices (Isles, 2008). Lindon(2003) cited by Isles (2008) also states that over-protectiveness towards children can, in the long run, cause more harm than it intends to prevent.

 

Children also have rights, including right to play (children's rights need to come before parents).

 

I'm sure that within the Early Years Foundation Stage guidance, there will be something to support challenge/risk/resilience.

 

Maybe a parent workshop that helps parents understand the benefit's of outdoor play - including minor accidents part of normal learning and development.

 

Isles, M. (2008) Children, families and the law. In. Collins, J and Foley, P. (eds) Promoting Children's Wellbeing: policy and practice.

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