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Come Xhosa An Listen....


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I have several sites which I use for sourcing free EAL signage but I am drawing a complet blank for the South African Xhosa language. Ideally I would like some signage for simple first words like hello etc and numbers.

 

Neither of the commercial sites I use have this language available nor indeed does my local authority resources website. It is important the child I am working with keeps a good awareness of this language as it is highly likely that she shall return home oneday and will need to communicate with her family members and community over there.

 

Does anyone know of a site or any free resources covering this language at all? I would be eternally gratefull.

 

Ta vary muchly in advancement :o

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Can the parents write them for you?

Cx

 

This is an interesting question....I have over the last ten years or so worked with many different dual language familieis and come to the conclussion that although you can ask them for help, many of them actually think if you have taken the time to research things yourself it is an example of you really valuing their language and not just being tokenistic. So whilst I have already spoken to parents about them bringing in books /words/songs etc and working with us...this shows that I am fulfillin my end of the partnership.....at least thats what I have found to be true. :o

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This is an interesting question....I have over the last ten years or so worked with many different dual language familieis and come to the conclussion that although you can ask them for help, many of them actually think if you have taken the time to research things yourself it is an example of you really valuing their language and not just being tokenistic. So whilst I have already spoken to parents about them bringing in books /words/songs etc and working with us...this shows that I am fulfillin my end of the partnership.....at least thats what I have found to be true. :o

 

 

I find this interesting too. I have taught many many families over the years who speak other languages and almost always found that they like helping you to pronounce their language. Its a great way to build parent partnerships, and as many words in xhosa has 'clicks', its easier to get parents to say them so you can hear how they should sound. Most families are delighted that you have just made the effort, even if you get it wrong! Perhaps you could show them your list of words and ask first if they are correct and then how to pronounce them correctly? (unless the child can do this, sometime once they get over their shyness, they are happy to correct you!)

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Most families are delighted that you have just made the effort, even if you get it wrong! Perhaps you could show them your list of words and ask first if they are correct and then how to pronounce them correctly? (unless the child can do this, sometime once they get over their shyness, they are happy to correct you!)

 

I totally agree. It shows that you're genuinely interested, and I usually find it give the parents a real confidence boost when they 'correct' your spellings/pronunciations !! :o

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I find this interesting too. I have taught many many families over the years who speak other languages and almost always found that they like helping you to pronounce their language. Its a great way to build parent partnerships, and as many words in xhosa has 'clicks', its easier to get parents to say them so you can hear how they should sound. Most families are delighted that you have just made the effort, even if you get it wrong! Perhaps you could show them your list of words and ask first if they are correct and then how to pronounce them correctly? (unless the child can do this, sometime once they get over their shyness, they are happy to correct you!)

 

I have already done this and used the material with the child who was wide eyed and full of smiles as I counted in xhosa and said hello in xhosa. Dad and I had already also talked about how difficult it is to get some of the sounds right as it is a language were the same words can mean different things depending on intonation etc. but we agreed that it is also usefull sometimes for children's to see adults getting things wrong as it helps them recognise that we all learn new things and dont always get them right first time. :o

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