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Am I The Only Person Who Doesn't Like Pirates


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While I acknowledge that this topic can generate a lot of rich language and vivid imaginary play, I would never use it as a theme in my nursery.

Lets not forget they were violent ruffians who raped, pillaged and plundered. The skull and cross bones is full of scary imagery. As a child I remember being terrified of Long John Silver although I'm sure todays children would think him quite tame. Should we be idolizing these violent criminals.

Am I alone in my beliefs, it seems a popular topic with others?

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I'm uncomfortable with it to a certain extent, too. I think whenever the pirate idea has come up in our nursery, we have turned it into an adventure-theme, sailing in choppy seas, seeing beautiful islands, fending for ourselves eg fishing and eating fruit, making boats, pretending to build rafts,etc etc. We've ignored all the nasty stuff and to be honest, none of the children have gone off on those sort of tangents.

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Me neither!

I've skipped the idea although it was pencilled in as a possibility in the planning meeting. The boys in my class need NO MORE excuses for getting another action packed fighting game started!

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Isnt using Pirates just a variation of a theme though? Children will always have 'goodies' and baddies' in their play, cowboys and indians, british and germans, cops and robbers, superman and lex luther, batman and the joker, power rangers and rita repulser. I think so long as there are supporting adults who can explain the bad behaviour and the responses we can use instead of shooting, fighting etc then we are allowing them to have their imaginative play but with a thoughtful aspect thrown in. The only time I had to intervene in my childrens responses was at the Tank museum, when, on seeing a german tank my youngest who was about 5 at the time started kicking the tank and shouting bloody germans. My children had heard a lot of stories of WW2 from my dad and from me, it started after explaining why grandad hadnt got a dad and from watching old war movies, but we were also able to talk about the wrongs on both sides and how much simpler life would be if everyone could get round a table and talk. Over the years its gone further to encompass other conflicts and into more depth and I hope I've been able to give them the opportunity to think things through in their own lives. And when you see Jonny Depp in Pirates of the Carribean, they're not so bad :oxD

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I agree with Rea too, and although I used to ban any role play of this type have found it useful to steer the children's interest into a theme such as Pirates to really explore conflict being part of our world ... it doesn't mean that it is a way to solve problems or you are condoning it by involving children in a creative exploration.

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Thank you for your comments everyone, I see I'm not alone which is a relief.

I take your point Rea about "goodies" and "baddies" and the need to act out their fears, I just believe that when approaching a theme /topic we should be presenting possitive images.

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I'm sorry but I thought we were all meant to respect and celebrate a range of festivals from different cultures/religions? Whatever happened to respect and tolerance? Please don't listen to the Christian propoganda regarding Halloween. :o It has it's origins in a Celtic festival which marked the evening of All Hallows - the start of winter. It may be a pagan festival but has every right to be included in our calendars. :)

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Thank you for your comments everyone, I see I'm not alone which is a relief.

I take your point Rea about "goodies" and "baddies" and the need to act out their fears, I just believe that when approaching a theme /topic we should be presenting possitive images.

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I dont necessarily think the children are acting out their fears though. I certainly didnt play army in a fearful way, it was just fun to crawl through the grass. I do agree that the children should have positive images but in war and conflict there are very few positives, it wont stop children from playing these games though which is why I think it all the more important that we do allow them to see both sides of something through well planned activities with adults who can support the learning, talking through the rights and wrongs, and other ways of dealing with conflict (I sound like a book now)

Halloween is a different matter, it's based on spirits of the dead and I cant see how it can be supported through fact so No, I dont do it, unless like Weightman its apple bobbing etc. :D

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In September every year Buddhists celebrate Boun Khao Salak which means festival of the Dead. Mexicans celebrate their version of All Hallows eve in the first two weeks in November. This is called Los Dias de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) and can be traced back to the Aztecs. Obon is a Japanese Buddhist festival usually held in mid-July or August and is known as the feast or festival of the dead. In July Chinese people celebrate Gui Jie which is the feast of the Hungry Ghosts. :o

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Sorry, but I love pirates, but I must admit that I've only done it with older children.My daughter, nearly 6 loves them too and I haven't tried to influence her at all. In fact she's having a pirate b.day party.

 

As for Halloween, I don't do it specifically, but I love Meg and Mog and some of the witchy stories. The only thing I don't like is trick or treating and I won't let that happen in our house (much to my daughter's disgust)

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I guess with all of these things it is how you present and use them. I don't like trick or treating ... it just seems very mean spirited , but we have often set up a Meg's castle at Halloween time and had lovely creativity coming from making up amazing spells and ordering supplies (you know frogs legs, spiders and worms and the like !). We have also used a Funnybones focus at Halloween time to link in to something which is happening in the outside world in a bigger way now. I just think if in the Early Years we give our moral, creative and literate approach to things it will give an alternative to themes they will explore out of school anyway.

 

I'm sure I'll have annoyed someone again ... sorry !

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We talk about halloween in assembly (infant school) but that's all. It is mainly to remind the children not to go trick or treating without an adult... (Personally I HATE this revolting American habit!).

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Don't think you'll upset anyone Galleon! The people here are pretty good about lively discussions and differing views without taking offence. :)

 

(Ed: No we're not, who do you think you are, go and boil your head! )

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Perhaps I'm coming from a slightly different perspective here. Trick or treating is really really big up here so Halloween is a little difficult to ignore! :D I forget that it's not such a big thing in England.

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Hi Beau

 

In your opinion, it is an American import, or has Hallowe'en always been celebrated (if that's the word) in your neck of the woods?

 

Maz

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If you speak to some of the mums it's clear that Halloween is something that has been celebrated for a long time. There is an old couple (both in their 90's) who always get a large box of apples and another of oranges each year to give out to the kids in the village. But here children are expected to 'do a turn'. This could be telling a joke, singing a song or any sort of 'entertainment'. I have to say that I find it really nice - it's not an American thing at all! :)

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Where we live they only trick or treat visit you if you have a lighted pumpkin in the window. Took us a couple of years to work that out - we used to wonder why all the little ghouls and ghosties left us alone.

 

Unless of course they know I'm too scary for Halloween! :o

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what a sensible idea Steve, wish we did something like that up here. I hate halloween with a vengeance and since our callers start trick or treating about a week before hand we end up putting signs on the door saying 'do not disturb'.

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Hi Beau

 

In your opinion, it is an American import, or has Hallowe'en always been celebrated (if that's the word) in your neck of the woods?

 

Maz

29501[/snapback]

 

It's the trick or treating that's American!

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I've never really understood Trick or Treating. When our door is knocked are we supposed to give them a treat? Or play a trick? Or not give them a treat and receive a trick? Can I ask for a trick instead of giving a treat? You have 6 months to discipher this for me :oxD

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It's the trick or treating that's American!

29555[/snapback]

 

I thought so too, but I had an American acquaintance who said we Brits didn't have a clue about Hallowe'en. They certainly do it in style, so to speak.

 

For myself, I don't remember decorating or going out trick or treating for Hallowe'en, but I do remember being spooked by my brothers who told me that if I looked into a mirror I would turn into a witch...

 

Anyway, we were too busy getting ready for Bonfire night.

 

Penny for the Guy, anyone??

 

Maz

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