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Colour Blindness


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Hello

 

Just had a parent ask me about colour blindness and unfortunately I do not have a clue.

 

Her child is having problems 'remebering what is red and what is green'.

 

She has asked if there is a way of telling and if it's too early to tell.

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, so that I can pass it on.

 

Sorry forgot to say, he is going to school in September.

 

Thank you x

Edited by bugbabe
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From what I can gather, it affects males rather than females.

 

I would suggest to her that she take him to an opticians to get them to test the child. I don't think there is any 'cure' as such.

 

If he's 4 and not learning delayed he would be able to distinguish colours by now.

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Hi

 

Colour blindness can be a tricky one to detect (i'm colour blind myself) early on. Some children just take a little longer at grasping the concept of colours and differentiating between certain colours. I was diagnosed with colour blindness at around the age of six, i would recommend you refer your parent to a health professional such as a school nurse or GP. Anumber of tests can be done to quickly establish if the child has the condition.

 

Hope this has helped :+)

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Colour blindness is an odd thing. We thought for a long time that my youngest might be colour blind because he seemed to be unable to recognise colours, but could happily match. So if we asked him to fetch a blue pen he'd often bring back a red one. However if we held up a blue pen and asked him to bring us another one, he could do that easily.

 

We waited a while to see what happened and we found out that he struggled to remember the 'labels' - he simply didn't know the names of the colours so couldn't select the right colour without a visual cue.

 

I'd get mum to have a word with the optician and see what they say, but in the meantime I'd advise her not to go overboard with the colour recognition questions - my son was driven half demented by us all asking him "what's this colour?" and I did begin to wonder if he knew his colours but was just so fed of up being asked all the time that he refused to play the game!

 

Maz

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I think it depends which colours the child gets mixed up. Is it blue/green, red/yellow? I read something years ago.

 

In primary school, Nigel was colour blind, I remember giving him the wrong coloured crayons on purpose. I was a terrible child :o

Edited by Rea
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My husband is blue/green colour blind and the lighting makes a huge difference. He can manage better outside in sunlight than in artificial light. So might be worth trying different locations to see if it makes a difference.

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great advice already, i'd suggest that parents take the child to optitions, my husband went through years where it wasn't spotted even though he was colouring horses green and the field brown!!!! i have 3 boys and due to husbands colour blindness i took them when they were fairly young, the test is very simple as i remember and all weren't colour blind!

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we have a boy who is colour blind. he is just 4 school sept. advised parents to go to optitions they tested him and yes he is. he can be quite clever though and you think sometimes hes ok but apparently they can learn what the different shades look like and with objects learn that the box is red but dont really know that.

 

buttercup

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I think shades of red/green is a popular one for colour blindness, and this is one of the ones which means they would struggle in an adult world in some occupations - i.e. red stop lights, green go lights.

 

My son aged then about 4 took a standard colour blindness test by our optician the bubble picture type, unbeknown to her or me the cheeky monkey thought it would be fun to fib about what he could see.

 

When he wanted to take the recruitment exams to be an air traffic controller, I said they wouldn't take him because of his colourblindness - this was at the age of 18 - this is when he finally owned up, over that time optician had tested him again but he continued to play his little game with us all. Finally, he took the test and passed - unfortunately he didn't pass the air traffic control recruitment tests!!

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