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Recognising Numbers To 10


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Please Please Please Can You Help!!!!

 

No matter what I do I have 10 children in my class who do not recognise numbers to 10, 5 of these children do not recognise numbers to 5!!!

 

I have tried precision training and that only worked with a few children....I will continue with this but I really need some new, creative and exciting ideas. What activities can I do to teach number recoginition! We have key worker slots everyday and this time is used for number recgnition but it is just not working! Can you please share with me your practice and experience of what did work!

 

Also I would like to send something out to these parents regarding practising number formation at home. Any ideas? Or letters you send home to parents?

 

Thank you stressed Sarah :o

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Not helpful but .... I have a few children like this too! Is frustrating as I find they can't move on to 1 more/less or any activity that uses numbers (such as sequencing, etc) until they recognise the numbers and have an understanding of their value/place value. I have just updated my profiles and it looks like some children haven't made any progress in their NLC bit of PSRN - they have but it is small steps so it doesn't show up as they have to show it as CI activities and have to learn a lot to tick off the points. Of course I also have (as I'm sure you do) children who came in able to do NLC 1-8 and more!!

 

Sorry not helpful, but looking forward to any responses!

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Not helpful but .... I have a few children like this too! Is frustrating as I find they can't move on to 1 more/less or any activity that uses numbers (such as sequencing, etc) until they recognise the numbers and have an understanding of their value/place value. I have just updated my profiles and it looks like some children haven't made any progress in their NLC bit of PSRN - they have but it is small steps so it doesn't show up as they have to show it as CI activities and have to learn a lot to tick off the points. Of course I also have (as I'm sure you do) children who came in able to do NLC 1-8 and more!!

 

Sorry not helpful, but looking forward to any responses!

Hi

 

We've been making ice balloons etc all week. tomorrow we have put numbers in water in yoghurt pots which hopefully will be frozen by the morning. Children will ideally recognise and put in order as the ice melts and then can record the numbers!

 

Hope this helps!

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The children need to immersed into numbers, as I am sure you realise but if you wish to develop recognition skills, I have found it helpful to concentrate on one number at a time, show the children the number tell them what it is and then let them look for it and concentrate on that one and that one only. Writing the number and using it to label sets of that number of objects can help too.

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We have this too - and we have decided to put numbers 1 to 5 and 6 to 10, on as many things as possible - the large construction bricks, chairs, coat pegs, milk for snack!

 

The reason some children have less developed number recognition or counting skills is because they haven't done enough of this at home at an early stage - you are therefore having to play catch-up.

 

They will get there eventually - due to maturity! Don't worry too much, just keep up your usual very good practice!

 

Jenni

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Do you have numicon? Its really good for giving children a concept of what a number means because normally were so busy saying 4 fingers, 4 apples 4 this 4 that rather than just what is 4. If yyou get me. Also you get some sparkly numbers from the catalogues that doont cost too much. These are really tactile and the hcildren love feeling them, drawing around them, puttin gthem in a feely bag and guessing...allsorts. Hope this has helped.

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  • 3 weeks later...

i use number dominos rather than the spotted ones, numbers in water or sand. also sparkle box have lots of number recognition resources

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I had no idea been a member of fsf a while but only recently started using the site. Sorry for my previous post I had missed the information. Thanks for the link to the update x

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Some years ago I aquired, from another teacher, some large stepping stones with nos 1 to 20 on them. They are made from different shades of sugar paper and basically they are like a large blob with the number on them. They have been laminated (A3). We use these outside and they lare like stepping stones which the children love and ther is lots of recognition of numbers whilst playing.

 

We are still doing lots of number counting with our superstar maths group as some still not counting reliably to 6.

Redbase :o

Edited by redbase
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I got some of these when I was at a conference the other day:

 

http://www.sweetcounter.co.uk/bunnies-p-258.html (but mine were cheaper as they were doing conference prices!)

 

They are really good - each rabbit is holding the correct number of carrots, and the rabbits get bigger as the numbers increase. Just looking at them today, some children who found smaller/larger numbers tricky found it so much easier with these.

 

And one of my 'no idea about numbers' boys is really starting to show an interest (such as pointing out to me that the numbers on the rabbits are the same as one of our other numbery things) - so there is hope, it will come eventually!!

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Hi,

 

Sorry I am not a teacher, but I helped my little girl with this, dong one or two numbers daily and when she got them I moved onto the next one. I started with her age and not zero.

 

Around and round and round we go, when we get home we have a 0.

 

Start at the top and down we run, that's the way we make a 1.

 

Around and back on the railroad track, 2, 2, 2.

 

Around the tree and around the tree, that's the way we make a 3.

 

Down and over and down some more, that's the way we make a 4.

 

Down and around and a flag on high, that's the way we make a 5.

 

Down we go and make a hoop the number six makes a hoop.

 

Across the sky and down from heaven, that's the way we make a 7.

 

Make an S and do not wait, when we get home we have an eight.

 

Make a loop and then a line, that's the way we make a 9.

 

 

Lisaxx

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I don't focus on number formation at the same time as number recognition as I feel they are two separate skills, and the priority is the recognition. If children's fine motor / hand eye coordination skills are not ready, their difficulties in forming the numbers could hinder their concept of what the numbers look like.

 

Also, just wanted to support the earlier comment about numicon - it's great for supporting the development of lots of mathematical concepts, such as more / less, ordering numbers, missing numbers etc without recognition difficulties getting in the way. Kind of similar to magnetic letters etc helping children who aren't great with their pencil hold at using their phonic knowledge to spell words.

 

I really like an idea I read on here ages ago for number recognition of getting the adults / children to wear different numbered birthday badges - a fun way to spot the different numerals round the classroom - who's wearing number 3 today?

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codysmum i love your little rhyme! Definitely think it will help my children with their number formation! But yes probably once they have grasped number recognition. Just wanted to add that I too have a few who dont recognise numbers to 5 despite trying everything I can think of! But they have managed to recognise some letters!

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I was just wondering if the rhyme could be helpful in number recognition after all?

 

It could support children with certain learning styles. I think it matches mine because I can see that repeatedly tracing over each number formed from a variety of sizes and textures while saying the rhyme could help the children to remember and recognise each shape. I'm thinking whole arm movements, walking round chalk shapes, etc. rather than using the fine control needed for writing on paper.

 

Just a thought.

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I'm thinking whole arm movements, walking round chalk shapes, etc. rather than using the fine control needed for writing on paper.

Must be tired - thought you were talking worksheets then, Upsy Daisy! :o

 

Most of our children leave our pre-school recognising the numbers to ten (and often beyond) - everyday at registration we count the boys, the girls and then all the children (or in any other combination, depending on what the children choose) and part of this process is making the sum which involves the children finding the right number that corresponds to the number of children they have just counted.

 

We use various strategies to help children begin to recognise the numbers - counting along a number line together, or by matching, or by describing what the number looks like, depending on the stage of development of the child.

 

I also love your rhyme codysmum - must print it out for when children begin to want to write the numbers too!

 

Maz

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at registration we count the boys, the girls and then all the children and part of this process is making the sum which involves the children finding the right number that corresponds to the number of children they have just counted.

 

Hi

We do this too, the children also self register by placing their named sparrow(we are sparrow class) onto a numbered tree.

 

We play a reall simple gameI hide toys in a tin and the children guess how many, when we have a few goes and found it is difficult I begin to write the number on the tin, without any comment, a HA child or LSA will begin to guess correctly all the time and we discuss how useful numbers are, they are like a secret code/magical. We extend the game with children writing symbols and sums on the tin. It is so simple but I have seen several children having a eureka (OH so numbers are useful)moment playing it.

Fay

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