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Help Finding A Theorist


Upsy Daisy
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I'm writing an essay about my approaches to teaching and learning in mathematical development and I would like to argue that it is not appropriate to decide beforehand what a child will learn from a planned activity. I need to find someone who has an opinion I can quote about whether we should plan for learning outcomes or offer the activity then note what the child actually did learn. I can find nothing at the moment. If anyone has read anything which I can link to this or can throw any names my way I would be eternally grateful.

 

Does it fit with the Reggio approach? I haven't read enough about it to know yet.

 

Please help :o

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Is this too recent?

 

Nursery World (Lindon,May,2008,p19) ‘young children cannot be active in their own learning if they are directed into predetermined activities, sometimes planned months in advance. Inflexible written plans are also usually linked with ‘learning outcomes or intentions’ that would still be educated guesses, even if they were written yesterday about individual children whom you know very well.’

 

 

 

Lindon, J. (May, 2008) “All about… Planning for the EYFS. What makes good practice when offering children learning experiences?” Nursery World, Haymarket Professional, London

 

Linda Pound springs to mind when thinking about children's mathematical development.

Edited by Deb
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No Deb,

 

That looks perfect. Thank you so much. Why didn't I think of Jennie Lindon?

 

You are a star. xx

 

That's why I love this forum so much and why it's very appropriate that this is my 1000th post!

 

 

Off subject, but Wow Upsy Daisy, 1000 posts!!!!! You have been busy!!!!! I don't know what I would do without people as wonderful as you who post on this forum.

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I don't know what I'd do without this forum either.

 

Well actually I know I would be a much more isolated practitioner who knew a great deal less about good practice. I also know that I would have found the FD course an awful lot harder (although I might have got my essays written a bit more quickly without the ever present temptation of a quick peek at 'view new posts')

 

Long may it continue.

 

The quote is now firmly planted in my nearly finished essay. Only another 5000 words to do this term :o

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Upsy Alison Daisy! :o

 

Just popped in to say .......... congratulations on your 1000th post........I always enjoy reading your posts.......they are always very helpful, thought provoking and when appropriate, fun!!! xD

 

Good luck with your essay!

Edited by sunnyday
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I hope you don't mind me borrowing that quote too Deb. I'm sure it will come in handy for the many more assignments I have left to do for the FD. Thanks.

 

And congratulations Upsy Daisy on your 1000th post. May there be many more...........and as my dad used to say..."may your mouth never run dry"!! I suppose in your case it would have to be your fingertips. :o

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Thank you everyone!

 

I do have to my mouth is about as likely as my fingertips to run dry - to a fault much of the time!

 

Here's to the next thousand. I should hit it around next Christmas I reckon xD

 

Now I have to go and find a way to lose 102 words from my essay. Using fewer words was never my strong point :o

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Guided participation theorised by Rogoff (1990, 2003) cited in Schaffer (2009) involved complimentary enlargement of a relationship that requires adult direction and child contribution, thereby involving shared thinking, a theory supported by Vygotsky whose socio-cultural theory involved the ZPD which also required adult support and guidance in order to scaffold further learning at the child’s pace of interest. However Piaget felt that children’s egocentric behaviour meant that they focused on the here and now to the exclusion of any other relevant features, having an impact on their ability to conserve information.

 

Schaffer, H.R (2009).Key Concepts in Developmental Psychology. London: Sage Publications Inc. P 44, 130

 

I used this in my Mathematics essay for the FD last year.

 

L

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Guided participation theorised by Rogoff (1990, 2003) cited in Schaffer (2009) involved complimentary enlargement of a relationship that requires adult direction and child contribution, thereby involving shared thinking, a theory supported by Vygotsky whose socio-cultural theory involved the ZPD which also required adult support and guidance in order to scaffold further learning at the child’s pace of interest. However Piaget felt that children’s egocentric behaviour meant that they focused on the here and now to the exclusion of any other relevant features, having an impact on their ability to conserve information.

 

Schaffer, H.R (2009).Key Concepts in Developmental Psychology. London: Sage Publications Inc. P 44, 130

 

I used this in my Mathematics essay for the FD last year.

 

L

 

Thank you lalaloulou. That could slot in quite nicely alongside my discussion of Siraj-Blatchford's shared sustained thinking. This part of social constructivism is really interesting - I wish I had more word count to explore it.

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Hi Upsy Daisy,

I don't know if it's too late but I've just come across quite a bit on mathematical devt in a book by Anne Edwards and Peter Knight - Effective Early Years Eduction: Teaching young children, 1994. I know it's a bit old but it does mean there might be something in there to argue with something more up to date.

Sam

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