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Research Which Doesn't Support Parental Involvement?


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Does anyone have any knowledge of any research which does not support parental involvement in young children's learning? I have so much for the opposing argument for my lecture tomorrow but I am really struggling with this part, and every internet search I start comes up with information which supports their involvement.

 

Thanks everyone.

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Thanks - you are making me feel sane again! I was beginning to wonder if I was overlooking something totally obvious. Might skim that instruction and move onto supporting evidence instead. Or better yet set the students that as homework! No, I wouldn't be that cruel.

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Is it worth looking if there is anything out there which justified the policy of keeping parents away when children were in hospital? I know it's a tenuous link but they did really believe it was better for the children so there might be something you could pick out.

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I know when I went to my first school there was a line painted on the playground that parents couldn't cross. It was apparently not thought good for children for parents to interfere with the education side of bringing up children!

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Hmm all I've been able to find is some very tenuous comments about how poor worksheet based participation can be worse than none at all and that some parents might not know what their role is so it might not be beneficial. Can't find any research to back this up though and it seems more like an argument someone might have thrown out and so it was included. Time is running low though so I'm going with discussing what arguments some might have given as reasons for not involving parents.

 

Thank you though for your considerations. I would still be interested if anyone finds an actual article which supports the view.

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I know when I went to my first school there was a line painted on the playground that parents couldn't cross. It was apparently not thought good for children for parents to interfere with the education side of bringing up children!

I know some practitioners who still feel this way, sadly.

 

Maz

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There are quite a few examples of how parents don't support their children, thus affecting their education

 

spoilt children disrupt class

 

and of course the time off for holidays debate.

 

I did have examples of over protective, indulgent, even aggresive or very rude parents who were difficult to embrace into my preschool, but we did, hoping to role model positive parenting. :o

 

Peggy

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How about the literacy programmes of old - where some didn't advocate paretns 'teaching' their children before starting school?

I'll see if I come across anything, it'd be interesting to post for future reference I think

sam

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The only possible time I think parents aren't supporting the children , although I suppose this also could be argued, is when they are trying to get additional benefits. I have come across children having special assessments for their behaviour etc as parents have said school has allegedlyreported problems. This can be distressing for the child and the school!

Apart from that I think it is a good thing that we have close contact with parents as this certainly gives me a better picture of what the child is capable of. Hope this is of some help :o

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I guess that one example of when it might not be appropriate would be if parents are teaching their child to "read". I am currently trying to locate a video of the correct pronunciation for phonics as so many of my children come in with "mummy says it is ...." and whilst they mean well, I'm just glad it isn't just down to me to retrain them. It's not really a case of it being an argument against their involvement but more a case of parents needing better support.

 

Thanks again though everyone, and I would be interested for future reference if any one can find strong examples. At least we'd all know where to refer people in the future!

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I guess that one example of when it might not be appropriate would be if parents are teaching their child to "read".

 

And don't forget teaching them to 'write' - using capital letters and starting them all from the bottom!

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And don't forget teaching them to 'write' - using capital letters and starting them all from the bottom!

 

My husband still writes his 's' from the bottom, and he's a draughtsman

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I think someone called Wolfendale is against parental involvement or has some reservations about it, I believe that in some schools parental input does not add to the child's education and welbeing.

 

Sorry to be vague but did it last term at Uni and it was in someone elses book.

 

Lou

x

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Thanks Lou. If you could get me any more details sometime I would be grateful. Just Googled the name with Parental Involvement and came up so many hits I'm a bit bewildered!

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