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Number Recognition


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First, can I just say as an eta I love this site, but feel guilty that I just ask for help or read posts to pick up lots of hints and tips. So has you may have guessed I am after some help. I have been asked to work with a four-year-old boy to support his number recognition. The little boy is struggling to retain any, and I wondered if anyone had any ideas for activities i could do to help him.

Edited by niallybob
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I love answering these questions, so don't worry!

 

Look for multi sensory possibilities to really 'stick' it in his brain. He could draw number shapes in sand, in chalk on the ground, make them with twigs, with his body, in the air with a hand. He could go on a 'number trail' around your setting to see if he can spot that number anywhere.

 

Hope that helps!

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You could hide some large numerals and go on a treasure hunt.

Make numerals from playdough

See if he can make his body match the shape of some numerals

Chalk numerals on some tarmac and get him to walk along them

 

What is he interested in? Find ways to link with those interests. Numbers on football shirts or racing cars for example.

 

Are you looking at getting him to recognise the number of objects they represent or just to be able to name the numerals?

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thanks for your help, he can count to ten ,but cannot recognise any numbers. i thought i had made some progress when he could find numbers one and two from one to five but had forgotten them the next day. will try some of your ideas, so fingers crossed

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Have been in exactly your position - agree the multisensory approach is the way to go-

collage

clay/dough

write in sand/gloop/cornflour

use number cutters with salt dough or real biscuit dough (bribery!)

make with pipecleaners/willow/thread packing peanutts onto wire

make huge ones to run round with chalk or skipping ropes

hide numbers on cards/pebbles/magnetic,etc and have a treasure hunt - points for each one he ids correctly with prize

paint or use glue and sprinkle with sand or glitter to run hands over

use birtthday badges and get all the adults he will see that day to wear the same one or different depending how he is doing

blindfold him and 'write' number on his hand to guess and swap over

make a track for a marble to run down which will write a number (looking from above)

make registration plates fo the bikes etc

take photos or cut up magazines to make a 1 book, 2 book etc - include pictures of things he has made/done

feely bag

make number finger puppets - you can chop the fingers off rubber gloves and write or stick no s on - put on in wrong order and get him to sort out

use finger puppets/gloves again with counting rhymes

look at BBc Numberjacks

 

All I can think of just now but know are more have done - if can remember will be back!

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  • 1 year later...

I love so many of these ideas and will steal (:D) however we have also found repetition and practice works too.

 

We have a Rising 5's session where we do a small activity of number recognition and putting that number on our number carpet.

 

Lasts about 10 mins tops (11 children) and is really working.

 

After this one term parents have been commenting how much their children have been pointing out numbers/showing more interest in numbers that they see.

 

Rachel

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didnt catch his age, but maybe they are not important to him just now, look at his development as a whole, does he lack in all areas or just this one?

 

always as suggested work with his interests we have numerals on boards (cork, im a pack away) dotted all around my settimg at children height stuck on (with my favourite) blue tack. so where ever they choose to play or eat there is a numeral in their face and learning opportunites at every turn

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Can he match numbers? The reason I'm asking is that I've just discovered that a 6 year old in my asd class who is very bright in practical subjects such as science but has always struggled with number recognition, matching and reading activities finds the work much easier if printed on lilac paper (we tried lots of colours and lilac seems best for him). We are in the midst of assessments for dyslexia and irlen syndrome but since discovering this 2 weeks ago he can suddenly recognise numbers and even read a few words. Just a suggestion but it might be worth a try if only to rule that out.

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Hi rachelllps

 

What does your rising 5's session include?

 

 

We always start off with numbers, we show number cards which have the numeral and also the same number of dots to count. Each child is shown a number and asked what it is, if they struggle they are shown one that we know that they recognise or will be able to count the dots. Then they all have to put their number on our number carpet, those that are stronger in number recognition often help the others.

 

Then we have free play but with reduced options such as computer, small world, tactile for instance. There are two members of staff and we move around supporting the children at the different activities.

 

Then we might do an activity to support some skill that we feel is needed, for example use of scissors. We also do some letter and sounds work as the term moves on and use wipe clean boards for letter formation and numbers. In the summer we do PE sessions so that they can get used to getting changed.

 

We do occasionally use the dreaded worksheets but as a group and with support and it might be sticking on stars to match a number on fireworks, or writing a letter to Santa which we sent off to him (fingers crossed we get a reply) or tracing lines or letters or numbers with a pen depending on ability.

 

There is another free play activity and then at the end children are encouraged to find their book bags, lunch bags coats etc and sit in the book corner ready for their parents.

 

Parents have been hugely supportive of this session and as I mentioned have been very aware of their children's improved recognition of numbers etc.

 

 

Rachel

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my four year old boys would not want to be doing this, they would want to be outside playing which is where our psrn session would be happening, in the sand, in the water and with the huge hollow blocks.

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Hi

We have found this a problem too. As children have found phonics easier with jolly phonics actions and stories we have started to develop pictures to go with the number and get them to make the shape sometimes with a story. Number 1 is a soldier tall and straight, start at his head and come down to his toes (get them to stand like one) 2 like a swan start at the beak curl round his neck down the body and on top of the water. I have made power point pictures to support and am developing classroom resources. Sorry these are on school computer and at home in the snow. will try to add to site if these will help : .

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  • 2 weeks later...
my four year old boys would not want to be doing this, they would want to be outside playing which is where our psrn session would be happening, in the sand, in the water and with the huge hollow blocks.

 

 

Hi Suer, please don't think this is inflexible!. Our last rising 5's sessions during the summer were totally boys (12) our one girl didn't attend and of course we adapted it to them, although we did have two boys who loved number activities specially learning how to write them.

 

Currently rising 5's is 7 girls to three boys but we have found the boys love finding the numbers and it doesn't last very long!

 

Rachel

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