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Hello

I have a reception class with 30 children starting in September. I am interested to hear anyone's recent experiences of an ofsted inspection and the suggestions of things that could be done in their classrooms.

Many Thanks !

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I would also love to know about the big 'O'!! We are due an inspection any time when we go back in sept!! Tracking is always an issue and not sure how to overcome it as entry data is so different between playgroups i have nothing the same!! I struggle to understand how some people judge as we still have some children coming into Year R with up to point 6 completed!!! Any advice or hints!! Thanks xx

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Thank you for your messages. Yes we are also due an Ofsted inspection... so thinking about tracking etc. I've just searched tracking on the forum and there is a really helpful on entry assesment which looks fantastic. (i'm not sure how to attach it on here so hope you find it )It'd be great to find any other thoughts

Thanks so much

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I have mixed R/Y1 class and we had ofsted in November. We had 2 inspectors in for 1 day and we have 4 classes in our school. We had subject leader meetings at lunchtime, which i managed to get out of as i had to have a FS leader meeting, apparently the subject leader meeting was hideous. My FS meeting was ok, she wasn't at all interested in the Y1's and only wanted to see my entry and exit scores for the previous cohort. All through the meeting she was saying this is good and that is good, but as the progress made from sept to June was satisfactory she could only give us satisfactory!!! She was not interested at all that the children who had made satisfactory progress had been part time until Easter, and the 5 full timers had made at least good progress.

 

It was a much better experience than previous ofsteds where you had so much notice and so much time to worry about it. We all felt that the inspectors knew exactly what grade we would get before they arrived at the school.

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We were rated good previously so we only had a one day inspection, after the initial call our Head was given a time when the inspectors called (an hour long call) to discuss the SEF the following day we were told what their focus was for the actual inspection.... implentation of ICT across the curriculum, The Early Years and provision for gifted and talented and SEN. There were two inspectors, one focused on the EY and SEN the other paperwork and the other stuff. He wanted to gauge whether the Head's assessment of the teaching was correct so they did brief paired inspections with the Head. The EY were inspected in the morning about 2 hours ( this was for two classes, the nursery and outdoor provision.) In the afternoon I met with the inspector to go through Learning Journeys, assessments etc. They wanted examples of work etc for 3 children across the ability range.I also had the opportunity to dscuss where I envisiged the Early Years heading and what I intended to do to improve further.

I made sure she didn't leave until I had shown as much of our practice as possible with photo evidence, class diary etc.

As Early Years Co ordinator and SENCO I got to spend 2 hours with her, it was very relaxed and as part of the final discussion with the ead she told him to give me management time fr the Early Years so I was very please with her!

Sharon

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Ah thank you. Thats given me lots of thoughts. Good thinking about the SEF. As we're expecting Ofsted in the first term, its probably a good idea to have all the assesments etc ready from last year and the learning journies etc ready for what we plan for this year. Its so helpful to hear other peoples experiences, thank you

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we had "what are your starting points?" sooooo, that'd be the old Base line??? okie dokie.

then we had what are your "where they are now" soooooo that'd be the old "tracking"

then we had "what are your next steps" okie dokie back to assesment

 

I was waiting for "how do you show value added?" that will be next.

 

same old stuff, different wording.

But very much the focus of an inspection.

 

I will applaud the inspector who walks in and see's happy, confident, engaged children and says "what ever you are doing must be right- no problems here- carry on and enjoy- and don't worry".

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Ah thank you, that is really helpful to know what the inspectors were asking! I know wouldn't it be wonderful if there could just see everything was working well and everyone was happy!

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Guest tinkerbell

We had ofsted just before Easter 31st March

.1 day 2 inspectors one of them Early years.

First question 'where were the present year 6 children when they entered school?' that floored me really as we didn't have paper based evidence (I hadn't taught them either).....I told them (carefully) we only need to have assessment evidence at the end of reception year.I then told them they would have done old baseline .We tracked children from yr2 SATS in those days.

 

The Early years inspector stayed in my room the first session of the morning

 

She talked to me as Early years co-ordinator/teacher for 45 mins at lunch

 

'where are the children when they enter school?' now we get children for 7 different settings and I do read their reports if they have them...I also do a booklet not unlike the one posted recently on this site(mines from tes resource )for the first 3-4 weeks,something for me to talk to the parents about at parents evening and then plan from the childrens needs.

She saw all these as I had the Learning journal files with all evidence to hand (said I had heaps,how did I find the time!!!)

She suggested ,which I will do, is to make a chart and 'roughly'because that is all it can be after 3 weeks jot down the childrens on entry assessment.We agreed that most children entered school with the skills typically expected for their age.

I also do the e-profile so could show her half termly progression

 

Heres the report so you can see how it has changed from previous inspection reports the Early years has its own section.Something else that threw me was the interest in the After school club.The inspector wanted to know how the EYFS children were looked after under ECM etc .....luckily I am the staffs line manager and I had been working with them on this as the inspector asked me to meet with them after school (knocked me down with a feather!!!)So if you have an after school club my advice is to find out what they are doing with your children...I am devising a sort oof weekly sheet that will pass information from me to them to parents???? anyway......I hope I havent babbled on and I have been some use to you

 

Tinkerbellx

 

Inspection report: School, 31 March 2009

 

 

Effectiveness of the Early Years Foundation Stage

Grade: 1

Children in the Early Years Foundation Stage enjoy an outstanding start to their education. They achieve exceptionally well in all areas of learning due to the high-quality provision for Reception children. This excellent start provides children with a very firm foundation on which to build their future learning and success, particularly in terms of their personal, social and emotional development. Children join the setting with the skills typically expected for their age. By the time they join Year 1 almost all reach a good level of development in all six areas of learning and most reach levels beyond this. Knowledgeable staff ensure that the setting provides all the required elements for children this age. The stimulating learning environment

enables children to blossom and entices them to engage eagerly in the multitude of exciting activities, both inside and outdoors. Children choose which activities they wish to undertake at the start of the session and happily explore, investigate and learn throughout the day. They also decide when to learn inside or outdoors. Adults provide skilful support and show particular expertise when asking children questions that challenge their understanding and support their learning. Staff are quick to identify children with learning difficulties and/or disabilities and to offer just the right levels of support. Excellent links with outside agencies ensure that this expert input continues for as long as necessary. The Early Years Foundation Stage is led and managed outstandingly well. Parents are particularly appreciative of the time staff devote to helping their children to make a smooth transition into the Reception class from a wide variety of early years settings. They typically comment, ‘My child is loving every minute here.’ There is a keen regard to all the required welfare elements. The setting is secure, clean, safe and orderly and staff develop first-class attitudes and behaviour among the children and meet their individual needs extremely well.

After school club

Children’s welfare is equally well promoted by staff in the out-of-school club. There is rightly a key focus on children enjoying their time here and winding down after a busy day in school. Children enjoy dressing up, writing and drawing as well as socialising. They sit together companionably and eat a healthy ‘tea’ of baked potato, salads and bread. Safety, health and well-being issues are well addressed. Children feel secure in the school’s familiar environment and have a key worker who takes care of their needs. The highly skilled Early Years Foundation Stage leader oversees the setting and ensures that the provision meets the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage. Embryonic learning journals and more regular observations along with well-established verbal feedback to Reception staff ensure strong links with the school staff and good communication about individual children’s needs. Activities are carefully linked to the six areas of learning. Practitioners are currently working towards further qualifications.

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  • 2 years later...

 

I’d like to share my experience with big O. I have to say that without this forum and all the people contributing I would find it much harder to get my GOOD :D:o

 

So here we go…( I am in Reception, he came on the 21st of September ) .

 

He looked through the planning ( long, med, short ) , how I assess (I have 5 different ways of gathering evidence of scale points for each child which is post its, photos, long learning story, quick tick assessment, reading records plus key words and phonics ), wanted to know what links I have with nurseries before my kids come to Reception ( none by the way as my kids come from 7 different ones) , risk assessment for the classroom, links with parents (exactly if there is a day to day log type book to inform parents what happens).

 

He wanted to know what kind of induction process we have in place (home visits and other open evenings etc )

 

He also (obviously) looked through the data (last year on entry until the end of Reception and wanted to see value added (I know!!!).

 

Additionally, he wanted to know how long it takes me to do my on entry data and where is area of weakness. ( takes me 4 weeks ish )

 

Also, he wanted to know how I track progress and how I identify the gaps in learning.

 

There was also a question about my provision, how my days look like, how do I make sure that each child has opportunity to work with a grown up ( I have 4 groups according to ability ).

 

I got GOOD which I am ecstatic with to be honest. When he gave me feedback he motioned the scissors that he saw some kids walking with them being open and that potentially could be dangerous. Personally, I think crayons are a greater risk that rounded scissors…anyway!

 

Some of my kids were on scooters with one of my helpers and he said there was no purpose for the activity but there WAS! There were parking in numbered bays so - number recognition. He said he did not see it but in fact he did not go out on the concrete playground to speak with my helper about what she was doing with those scooter, that is why he could not see it! :(

 

He liked good balance of adult and child initiated activities, he was impressed of how quickly the kids settle in but wanted to see some kind of climbing equipment which I do not have and there is no space for one anyway. He liked the fact that I used my TA well as well as my helpers. (I have lots, I am a lucky one)!

 

I am really happy that it is all over but without your forum I would not be as ready as I was so thanks to all people who contributed to OFSTED topic, it really helped me a lot!

I am so thrilled that when I have my report I will post it in here!

 

If you have any more questions please ask, I am happy to share of what I do![/size][/size] xD

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Hi Mona, can I ask what you produced for your long term and medium term planning? It's just now we are expected to be planning weekly/daily based on children's interests and individual needs.

 

Thank you

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Hi Mona, can I ask what you produced for your long term and medium term planning? It's just now we are expected to be planning weekly/daily based on children's interests and individual needs.

 

Thank you

 

 

Ginamaria,

 

I will post my long and med term planning. Long is really for my head so that she knows what I am concentrating on every half term, theme if you like. It's just one page, overview of the whole year. It's extrememly flexible!

 

My med is ideas for me of what to do in maths say, what games to play, it's more for me so that i can quickly see what game i invented say for handa's surprise story.

 

and then my short is a day to day activities that i organise according to kids interests, or gaps in learning etc.

 

again, it's flexible, on friday i had something planned but kids wanted to go and collect conckers so we just did and we counted them in little groups

 

so really, long term plan is more for my head, medium is for me to keep track of my ideas and short is what i am to teach everyday, say hwo to do phonics and what sounds this week :)

Autumn_1_2011.doc

YEARLY_PLAN_2010.doc

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We were inspected in July and there were 2 inspectors who stayed for 2 days and 1 who stayed for the day (the early years inspector) we are a 1 form entry school. The early years inspector being there for just 1 day was pretty much in with me the whole day (or so it felt) she kept dipping in and out for 20-30 minutes at a time. I had a meeting with her after school which lasted about an hour and she asked me lots of questions mainly about data. She wanted to know specific things like the progress of the children who have free school meals, progress of boys, how I identify gaps in learning and what I do about it. My profile was up to date before the visit and I had worked out the value added for each area for each child and showed her that. She looked through the children's learning journeys and the class photos and asked me to talk her through the evidence I use to make a judgement. She asked me what my focus was for the year to take Foundation stage forward (talk for writing) and what I would be looking to do this year (problem solving) and she said 'what about boys and writing? and I said boys and writing will always be a focus. She asked about transition to school. She was lovely! she was very warm- the children came over to her to show her things and she had a lovely way with them so it was a very nice experience (I got a good) After that first day she left and I didn't have anyone else in with me I think the judgement had been made. (think decision had been made proior to visit based on sef and they were just in to confirm)

 

re children coming into reception on point 7 of the profile, the maximum they should be coming in at should be point 3. I would be very dubious about a child entering school with a 7 in anything! I take the transition documents I receive from preschool as only 1 form of evidence and expect to see for myself what they can do in my setting in several different contexts before I award the point. You really would be shooting yourself in the foot if you allowed a child to start at 7 as you would not get the 4 points value added and therefore could not achieve a satisfactory for the data. (that's not to say that If i genuinelly felt a child was achieving point 7 in anything that I wouldn't give it to them though-but I would want the evidence for myself which would take a while)

 

Deb

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re children coming into reception on point 7 of the profile, the maximum they should be coming in at should be point 3.

 

it's not quite as absolute as that but you would need to be demonstrating a) children's outcomes and b ) your teaching was at that level if they were achieveing above expectations on entry to F2.

 

cx

Edited by catma
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it's not quite as absolute as that but you would need to be demonstrating a) children's outcomes and b ) your teaching was at that level if they were achieveing above expectations on entry to F2.

 

cx

xD eeee bahhh gummm chaps...you should just jollywell think yourselves lucky you KNOW when theyre coming because the rest of us bods in early years like pre-schools etc...get no warning at all.....just a knock at the door and then the threat to huff and puff and blow our houses down unless we open our doors! So no matter how you feel about this at least you still have the chance to think about it before hand and prepare.......whereas we of course do not! :o

Edited by enuffsenuf
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