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I'd certainly agree with the complaint about having to write everything down, it takes practitioners away from the real job which is to focus on the children.

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I too agree with the 'write it down'comment. I spend half my life, trying to scribble down things children are saying/doing - missing out on supporting them play - all so I can get my 80% child initiated evidence for the eyeprofile... argh!

Why can't we just let the children play, in a supported way, with resources there, and be on hand should the children want to write, or so sums or something else more grown up?!

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It seems that it is contradictory the fact that you have to observe the children and interact with them to guide them in their developmental learning, yet how difficult it can become when you have to write exactly what you and the child have spoken. It looses spontaneity and the child might ask "Why are you writing?", which breaks the moment. When I which to write something, I have to do it when the children do not see me doing so! LOL

 

Another aspect is that, indeed, the way that the EYFS is presented is as lineal as it was before in the CG for the FS, even more... now they are divided by age, so lots of people will expect that those statements need to be achieved then. I suppose that planning will take that in consideration. No? Yet, if I have a child who has developmental matter issues and is doing so later, then I just have to go to the previous stage. At the hour of a report or summary profile it is not always that easy to say the child is at this "level/stage" or the other. For example, a girl during the 2nd term... I had a very verbal English speaking child (1st language) who did well in that aspect (ELG achieved), was working towards communicating better with other children (40-60+), and had difficulties reading and writing (30-50). So, in what age group would I put that she ended up? It is not fair for the child to be squared into something like this. No?

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I too agree with the 'write it down'comment. I spend half my life, trying to scribble down things children are saying/doing - missing out on supporting them play - all so I can get my 80% child initiated evidence for the eyeprofile... argh!

Why can't we just let the children play, in a supported way, with resources there, and be on hand should the children want to write, or so sums or something else more grown up?!

 

I totally agree with you! But, since the Rose Report has pushed things even more, then Reception children will surely enough be required to have formal lessons. To be able to achieve the high reading and writing expectations, one has to work each day with formal group lessons and then sit down with each child, individually, with a reading scheme. Ok, they love it and they progress... but shouldn't this be better for Grade 1 than for Reception, which is still part of the (EY)Foundation Stage?

 

But that is still the discrepancy for Reception... :o You can even see it with Scholastic Magazine. Is Reception part of Nursery Education or Child Education? It is in both!

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Thank you for sharing that ....a very interesting read......I particularly liked 'you can't record or quantify, care, love, song or play.....'

 

I am a 'fan' of Sue Palmer and have an opportunity so see (hear) her 'talk' next February.

 

I expect most people have read this ...but if not.....I heartily recommend....

 

'Toxic Childhood- How the Modern World is Damaging our Children and what we can do about it' - Sue Palmer

 

Sunnyday

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I too agree with the 'write it down'comment. I spend half my life, trying to scribble down things children are saying/doing - missing out on supporting them play - all so I can get my 80% child initiated evidence for the eyeprofile... argh!

On a recent Sally Thomas training, she was saying that most practitioners are able to remember enough of an observation of a child up to four hours after it took place in order to write something meaningful to inform planning/illustrate what they have learned. If not, a few key words on a post-it or small pocket notebook should suffice as an aide memoire for later transcription.

 

Alternatively, having one practitioner playing with children whilst another makes observations can work well, but this would depend on how many staff and children there are in a setting. How do childminders manage when they generally work alone? Perhaps some of our outstanding childminders could share how they manage?

 

It is tricky to maintain the balance between supporting children's learning and evidencing that the learning has taken place - but if we spend so much time scribbling that we can't play with our children then we won't have anything to evidence at all!

 

Maz

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What I wonder though is who is the evidence really for? It strikes me that they (government) are asking you to do it to get you to prove your professionalism, rather than for the benefit of the children.

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I look at the evidence gathering rather the other way so not 80% from Child Initiated but only 20% from adult directed!

 

So I use what parents say, info from other parties like Midday meals supervisors, out of school club, grand parents, childminders, children and then my obs at child initiated time.

 

I don't always write it down immediately either as I know it may stop the 'flow' but i do keep a day book and jot down there as soon as I can afterwards.

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