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Supporting Babies Walking


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Hello,

 

First post so hopefully in the right place. I'm currently a student on placement in a 0-5 setting and working in babies room. Was chatting with aparent who was concerned that their daughter wasn't walking much (age 10mths) and wanted to know what they could do to support them.

I discussed having supervision for them to 'bridge walk' between sofas and other furniture at their height and talked about how each child will develop at their own pace but wondered if anyone had any links to artices or support that I could pass onto the parent.

 

Thanks all

 

Graham

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Hi Graham, welcome to the forum. :oxD

 

Firstly I'd reasure the parent that 10 months is early to be walking anyway and not until around 18 months would anyone start to have concerns if there were little signs of walking.

Your suggestion that they 'bridge walk' is good but really, I'd be reasuring them that as soon as shes ready the child will suddenly let go and take some steps.

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I'm with Rea. 10 months seems early to be walking and the stages of crawling etc. are very important. If the child is exploring by crawling or bottom shuffling, I would reassure them that this is appropriate for this age and walking will follow when the child is ready. I think I'd also warn them that their life will be far harder work when she is walking and able to reach everything in sight!

Gruffalo2 :o

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thanks all.

 

I'll check childs age tomorrow as I'm second guessing myself now, might have got them 2 months off next room (16mths) rather than next birthday which was when babies changed in last placement. Obviously from the advice so far 14 mths is still a good age to be starting walking a little anyway.

As she has an older sister (4 and a bit) I wonder if parents are just comparing the history of one to the other.

 

Will let all know tomorrow

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i also found when mine were little that the older sibling would be placing toys etc within reach of the baby - this meant he didnt see the need to move from his place on the floor and was quite happy to let the older one do all the work .

perhaps at home thius is the case so baby (if older then you thought) doesnt feel the need to move around - but things like walking cant be hutrried - its a case of when baby is ready and sometimes if they can crawl really fast they seem content to do that for quite a while.

and welcome to the forum

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oh the excitement and frustration of waiting for babies first steps I was pulling my hair out with my first child she seemed to be so slow at wanting to walk she scooted around the funiture for months but wouldnt let go and take a step, finally at 17 months she took her first steps unaided she hasnt sat still since!! my second child was alot earlier so keen to get up and go she hardly crawled at all choosing to get up and go at 11 months (wanting to keep up with her big sister no doubt!) but I noticed a big difference in her skills and how often she fell over and bumped stuff compared to her older sister who had practised for so long before letting go (it was the same with potty training!)

 

just wanted to say I would tell the parent that walking like so many things cannt be rushed it will happen when the childs ready and not a moment sooner and it tends to be that the longer they take to aquire theses stills the more ready/competent they are when they do make their first steps.

 

if all other stages of development are proressing at a stead pace then suggest the parent enjoys this last few months/weeks of baby before the the toddler phase starts it will soon fly by!

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Might be worth mentioning that actually, recent research has shown that if they miss the crawling stage, this can lead to slower development later on. They need that 'on all fours' stuff to make important connections in the brain.

 

Might also be worth pointing out that as soon as the baby can walk, you're into a whole new realm of chasing him or her around. I remember desperately wanting my own children to walk, but as soon as they could I thought 'why on earth was I so desperate for that?'!

 

Welcome to the forum, great to see a bloke on here. We are going to be looking for a new member of staff soon, and I said to the committee yesterday, wouldn't it be great to get a man.

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I would just like to reiterate that crawling is a very important stage that cannot be rushed.

 

'Essentials of Literacy' by Tina Bruce and Jenny Spratt

 

'crawling is important for future learning because it 'supportss a strong sense of the centre of the body whilst in motion' (Greenland 2006).

 

'It is the first ime that children look from side to side without moving their head from side to side as they travel along. This will be important in later reading.'

 

'As children develop some doors shut as others open. Sarah-Jayne Blakemore and Uta Frith (2005:31) explain 'new learning means opening and setting neural connections for important events and closing others, that are no longer important and would only be distracting and confusing'. Babies need to spend time sitting on the floor and crawling so that the closing down of some movements can occur naturally, and in the process open the way for others. If they do not fade, the child could later experience difficulty in sitting still at a table or on a chair'..

 

 

I could go on, there is much more in the the book.

 

Hope that helps.

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Thanks for that Deb, really interesting.

 

I'm sure I read somewhere that crawling is also important for joining up right/left brain pathways, because of the need to use opposing sides, e.g. right arm forward, left leg forward.

 

This links into the whole idea of 'brain gym' which is very popular now in schools.

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I'm sure I read somewhere that crawling is also important for joining up right/left brain pathways, because of the need to use opposing sides, e.g. right arm forward, left leg forward.

 

/quote]

 

I've read that too Suzie - just cannot think where at the moment :o .

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Hey all,

 

Thanks for the replies, all interesting stuff and backs up some of the info we had been taught about crawling in our course which is always encouraging.

Little one was slightly older than I thought (14 mths) but as has been said seems that all is fine and the child seems to be wombling around either crawling or with support walking when I see them in garden.

 

Now If i can just finish writing all my work this weekend for EYP I'll be much happier.

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  • 2 months later...

:o

Might be worth mentioning that actually, recent research has shown that if they miss the crawling stage, this can lead to slower development later on. They need that 'on all fours' stuff to make important connections in the brain.

 

Might also be worth pointing out that as soon as the baby can walk, you're into a whole new realm of chasing him or her around. I remember desperately wanting my own children to walk, but as soon as they could I thought 'why on earth was I so desperate for that?'!

 

Welcome to the forum, great to see a bloke on here. We are going to be looking for a new member of staff soon, and I said to the committee yesterday, wouldn't it be great to get a man.

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