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Teaching French In Foundation Stage


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My Head is keen for all our classes to be teaching a MFL and as I feel most comfortable with French I thought I'd have a practise this next half term. I'm thinking of a few simple phases, numbers to ten, days of the week, colours and some key words based on our theme growing. I have found some help on Sparklebox but was wondering if anyone else could help me with resources etc they have used.

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Have you looked at the idea of immersion? so rather than teach the english and then french decide that for a period of the day you will speak only french, sing in french, play games in French, recite nursery rhymes in french etc. They have immersion days in the Canadaian schools so this is the only language used on that day and children who are not bilingual pick it up so much quicker.

 

When I think of non english speaking children who have come into our school this is how they have had to learn english and one little girl who was dutch speaking picked it up really quickly.

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How funny you should bring this up! A couple of my children are interested in all things French - following a lunchtime discussion about croissants and brioche! I said we'd find out some more French words if they wanted and all the children in my group were really keen! I'm thinking of introducing a few words and foods and songs (they already know 'Sur la pont', 'Ill et ne' (wrong time of year) and 'Frere Jacques', so I'm looking for some more if anyone knows any. Was thinking of doing a 'heads, shoulders' in French.

 

When we were revising for our O levels my friend and I used to do 'immersion' and we'd do everything in French or Spanish for weeks before each exam! oh - except revising for english lit and lang of course! :o

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Were nursaeryh age but we have a french teacher who come in each week for our 21/2 to 4 year olds, she always follows the lessons with activities that can be used in the classroom

She focusses on colours, shapes, fruits, meeting and greeting, lots of stories told in both french and english, lots of games etc

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We also have a teacher that comes in once a week to teach our 3-4yr olds basic french!

They absolutly love it and they all learn how to count to ten in french and say hello

and goodbye within a few months.

We also give the teacher a plan of what topics we are following in advance so she can

tailor her lesson to match ours....very worthwhile!!!

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We to have someone come in once a week with our 2.5 - 4 year olds.

None of our 26 children are 'forced' to join the group - but everyone of them does........they LOVE IT!

 

sometimes I worry that Ofsted will turn up and 'tut' at 26 'young' children sitting doing group work for 20+ mins, but as I've said it's free choice.

xxx

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I have a French version of Baa baa black sheep which a french child in my setting taught me once. Problem is I had to write it down myself so don't know if I spelt it all right. it's a long time since I did my o'level!

 

If one of you lovely people who has a french teacher visiting would like to download it and get it checked I would be really grateful. Then we can all use it.

 

Baa_baa_mouton_noir_97.doc

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I have a French version of Baa baa black sheep which a french child in my setting taught me once. Problem is I had to write it down myself so don't know if I spelt it all right. it's a long time since I did my o'level!

 

If one of you lovely people who has a french teacher visiting would like to download it and get it checked I would be really grateful. Then we can all use it.

 

Baa_baa_mouton_noir_97.doc

 

 

Baa baa moutons noirs

Avez vous des laines?

Oui monsieur, oui monsieur

Trois sacs pleines.

Un pour le monsieur,

Un pour la dame

Et un pour le petit garçon q’habite en le chemin

 

 

I didn't have that last line, but I like this one better as it rhymes better. It actually means the boy who lives in the way, but it's good enough for me!

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Têtes, épaules, genoux et orteils

Têtes, épaules, genoux et orteils

Et les yeux, oreilles et bouche et le nez

Têtes, épaules, genoux et orteils

 

Had a go with this just now. Because of the longer word syllables you can fit it in if you don't repeat 'knees and toes' the second time. The last line is longer too because of that, but I'm going to give it a go anyway!

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Baa baa moutons blanc

Avez vous des laines?

Oui monsieur, oui monsieur

Trois sacs pleines.

Un pour la blaireau,

Et un pour renard

Et un pour le petit fille avec des trous dans ses chaussettes

 

 

haha - this last line is a right old tongue twister!

 

 

Baa baa moutons brun

Avez vous des laines?

Oui monsieur, oui monsieur

Trois sacs pleines.

Un pour le âne,

Et un pour le porc

Et un pour le crocodile qui danse un gabarit

Edited by Cait
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Et un pour le petit fille avec des trous dans ses chaussettes

 

Ok clever clogs! (but shouldn't it be la petite fille?)

 

Those are brilliant but can you give us a translation?

 

I am seriously impressed. Did you do all that off the top of your head?

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Ok clever clogs! (but shouldn't it be la petite fille?)

 

Those are brilliant but can you give us a translation?

 

I am seriously impressed. Did you do all that off the top of your head?

 

 

Whoops 'la' fille of course! just making sure you are reading them!

 

Baa baa white sheep have you any wool, yes sir, yes sir, three bags full

One for the badger, and one for the fox, and one for the little girl with holes in her socks

 

Baa baa brown sheep have you any wool, yes sir, yes sir, three bags full

One for the donkey and one for the pig and one for the crocodile who's dancing a jig

 

Heads and shoulders knees and toes is the other one (more or less anyway)

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  • 1 year later...

Hi,

 

I'm looking to improve our inclusion for bilingual children and these songs are great!!

 

I even like the baa baa's for the animals.

 

Thanks for sharing them :-)

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I used to teach one called "Savez-vous planter les choux" which basically means "Do you know how to plant the cabbages!!

It then goes through different parts of the body with which you may want to plant them (bit weird really but the kids loved it!)

 

I've found the complete words on the mamalisa website ( http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=162&c=22) and you can find the tune on the same website (which also has loads of other songs in different languages)

 

Savez-vous planter les choux

À la mode, à la mode ?

Savez-vous planter les choux

À la mode de chez nous ?

 

On les plante avec le doigt

À la mode, à la mode

On les plante avec le doigt

À la mode de chez nous

 

On les plante avec les mains…

 

On les plante avec le pied…

 

On les plante avec le coude…

 

On les plante avec le nez…

Edited by janebe
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