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Teaching Rhyme


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Hello

I have just become a member and there is so much useful stuff on this site!

 

I am in my second year of teaching and am in a Reception class. When I was doing my PGCE I remember reading lots of stuff that said it was very important that children could identify rhyming words and make up rhymes before they went on to trying to hear individual sounds in words. Has anyone got any good ideas about how to teach children to do this, as most of my class seem not to be able to identify rhyming words when I read them nursey rhymes?

 

I would be very grateful for any ideas!

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Hi Swordfish and welcome aboard!

In my experience the identification of rhyming words is quite a difficult skill for children to acquire, although once they begin to understand or hear the rhymes there is no stopping them!

I have found that nursery rhymes are not an ideal medium, as in actual fact the rhyming words are often quite a long way apart. I bought 2 John Foster poetry collections and was amazed at how much more more successful this was. So I would suggest that good quality children's poetry is the way to go!

Have fun.

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i found that chidlren enjoyed it when we made up silly rhyming wrods to their names like sophie-tofie, greg-peg, jill-bill, rob- cob you get my drift and then we spoke about how the words sounded the same. The i foiund that using numnbers for rhying words was goo so it was "number 1 pass the bun" number 2 have some glue (they could always think of something more disgusting to rhyme with 2 (p**))their fav was "number 9 have some wine".

we did this quite often and informally and the chidlren enjoyed it as they were active participants.

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I agree with Leo-the sillier the rhyme the more they like it. We have a little boy who is just three who is very good at rhyming especially with colours-he has got an older sister! The other day his favourite was "This is blue I love you." Yesterday it was "pink stinks"! Try this rather than actual nursery rhymes or poems-because they are short and sweet the children might get them quicker!!

Linda

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Although hearing rhyme is obviously very important i wouldn't let it stop you teaching phonemes. Some children do find identifying ryhme difficult, but can still idenify inital sounds. Try using a nursery rhyem like humpty dumpty and getting them to rewrite is with a different rhyme.

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Welcome Swordfish,

 

We use Humpty Dumpty quite a bit ... HD sat in a tree, HD hurt his knee; HD sat on a chair, HD brushed his hair etc. etc.

 

Another thing I've done is give them a few rhyming words to tune them in and then the rhyme with the missing word - Ram, Sam, tam, cam, I like strawberry ..... (jam). Bee, see, he, me; Can I have a cup of ...... (tea). I'm sure you get the idea. I know continuing a rhyming string is one of the ELG (or stepping stones!) and I find children find this quite difficult. This is a way of getting them used to hearing lots of rhymes together.

 

Harricroft.

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Hi swordfish and welcome

 

Silly rhymes are definitely a good starting point. It's gets the children interested. My starting point was my surname. Although one little boy was thinking so hard about it for so long he shouted out a rhyme for my name three days later in the middle of a numeracy session!

 

My class liked these books

 

Pat the Cat and Friends

A flip-the-page rhyme-and-read book

( I found this blurb and thought it might be useful for you)

 

Colin and Jacqui Hawkins first created Pat the Cat to help their daughter to learn to read. The rhyming split pages helped her to recognise lots of new words simply by changing a single letter as she turned each page. She quickly caught on to the basic mechanics of reading. The Hawkins then went on to produce Jen the Hen, Mig the Pig, Tog the Dog, and Zug the Bug.Teachers recognised the books as excellent introductions to reading, and reviewers compared them to Dr Seuss. Children loved their rhyming humour. And parents have been using them successfully ever since!

 

Learn to read with Zug the Bug, a unique read-aloud book with its own vowel sound and comical character

Early phonics and a crazy character to help teach reading, writing, and spelling to the new reader

Your child will love the silly character - and you'll see this title as a great learning tool

Rhyming text and phonics help children learn and remember the key vowel sound

A book that can be read aloud to children as young as three. This early start will make it easier for them to read along at ages four to five and read alone thereafter

 

Denise

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Hi Swordfish

Our children like the rhyme, I'm being eaten by a boa constrictor. We encourage them to suggest rhymes,eg.Oh fiddle he's eaten my middle.

Anita

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Hi Swordfish

Our children like the rhyme, I'm being eaten by a boa constrictor. We encourage them to suggest rhymes,eg.Oh fiddle he's eaten my middle.

Anita

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Hello Swordfish, I've just ordered a book from amazon 'nonesense nursery rhymes' (not arrived yet). A-Z of rhymes, the write-up is very positive, but there are loads of that kind of thing to choose from, nonesense number rhymes, silly poems, nonesense christmas rhymes, and quite cheap too. :D

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hi there Swordfish Cordfish :D:D

and welcome aboard

 

I totally agree with Leo about the names children love it when I'm doing the register I sometimes call out a rhyming name such as 'Hello Lana Banana' etc. However, some children don't like this and so I have to be sensitive to those that don't.

 

Before recognising rhyme though children need plenty of experience with sound/listening games and being able to distinguish one sound from another, recognise background/foreground noise etc. There is are tons of ideas out there to enhance these early listening skills. Tapes with sounds in the environment; musical instrument echo (were one hides behind a screen plays an instrument and the other 'echos' the same back) Lola the listening leopard ( Lynn Broadbent and Ros Bayley at Lawrence Education have this and lots of other books to encourage listening skills)

 

Another BRILLIANT book is 'Foundations in Literacy' by Ros Bayley and Sue Palmer. There are some excellent ideas on auditory discrimination. I got mine via Amazon it's about £17

 

Hope some of this helps :)

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wow

I am so overwelhmed by how helpful everyone is!

You have all given loads of good ideas that I will definitely be using in class

Thankyou so much!

(am off to look on Amazon for some of the books now...)

 

swordfish

xxxx

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A favourite of mine which is very simple and the children love it is "Willaby Wallaby ...."

 

e.g. Willaby Wallaby Wiz ..... an elephant sat on .....? Then wait for the children to say .... Liz or Willaby Wallaby Weve ..... an elephant sat on ......??????

 

:)

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Swordfish while you are searching on Amazon, the song willaby wallaby that Libby mentions can be found on a fantasmagorical CD called 'Songs for the very young' by a Canadian singer called Raffi... i really recommend it as it's got lots of familiar and a few unusual yet simple and catchy songs for the very young. My Reception kids love it to bits; our favourites are willaby wallaby, there's a spider on the floor, this little light of mine, the more we get together; in fact the whole CD is blooming marvellous. You can hear snippets of Raffi on Amazon :D

Have fun

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Thanks for that Liza! I can't remember where I got it from. I've always sort of chanted it - didn't know it had a tune!!!

 

Now I can sing it!! :o:(xD:D

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Nonesense nursery rhymes has arrived... example below

 

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall

Humpty Dumpty had a great fall

He didn't get bruised, he didn't get bumped

Humpty Dumpty bungee jumped

 

Mary Mary quite contrary

What does your garden hide

Beetles and bugs

Slithery slugs

And shells with snails inside

 

It's really good :D

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Variations of Baa Baa Black Sheep.....

 

Baa baa white sheep

have you any wool

yes sir, yes sir,

three needles full

one to mend the jumper

one to mend the frock

and one for the little boy

with a hole in his sock

 

Baa baa grey sheep

have you any wool

yes sir yes sir

three bags full

one for the kitten

one for the cats

and one for the guinea pigs

to knit some woolly hats

 

Sue J

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Rea,

 

Liked the sound of Nonsense Nursery Rhymes so looked for it on Amazon, but it seems to be selling for £44.95! Did you really pay that much, or has everyone gone out & bought up all the copies? :o

 

Dianne xxx

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