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We've just had a child confirmed with measles at our Nursery. The doctor said that he would notify the Local Authority. The EYFS says we must notify Ofsted but the Health Protection Agency (Government agency) says we inform Ofsted when there is "an outbreak" - Do I inform Ofsted or not yet? Also, any tips on informing Parents without creating panic would be gratefully recieved (usually with things like chicken pox we post a daily update on our notice board). Haven't dealt with this before - any help out there?

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Welcome to the Forum, purplewednesday1!

 

This is an interesting one. If it were me I would ring Ofsted and ask them what to do: better be safe than sorry. After all: their definition of an 'outbreak' may be very different than the HPA's.

 

About informing parents: I would do it by letter, giving advice about incubation/contagious periods etc, and what they should do to monitor their children - what signs and symptoms to look for etc, and stressing that they need to inform you if their child gets the measles.

 

If you can download a factsheet from nhs direct or some similar website, I'd print it on the back of the letter. That way you can be sure that every parent has the same information and knows exactly what to do.

 

Good luck!

 

Maz

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Thanks for your advice. I think I'll speak to Ofsted in the morning. I'm still a bit worried about the Parents tho'. Our Parents are inclined to hysteria if they think there's a problem. I want to give them the facts without givng them cause to panic - the doctor wasn't at all concerned and said that "rest and Calpol" was the treatment and that in an otherwise healthy child imeasles was a minor ailment. The problems come (apparently) when the child is malnourished or suffering from some other major illness in addition to measles. Hard to strike a balance? What do you think?

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Hi and welcome Purplewednesday1.

 

Sorry your first post has to be about something so potentially serious but Maz seems to have offered a good solution.

Many years ago I was told an inoculation within 72 hrs could avert an unprotected child becoming ill. (my 13m old son was in contact with measles as the first signs became evident on the ill child) You might want to take action on that if that is still the advice.

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Many years ago I was told an inoculation within 72 hrs could avert an unprotected child becoming ill. (my 13m old son was in contact with measles as the first signs became evident on the ill child) You might want to take action on that if that is still the advice.

That's really interesting, Susan: I wonder if parents whose children have not had the MMR would be tempted to have it done once there was a measles outbreak?

 

purplewednesday1: Here's a link to a factsheet about measles - everything you ever wanted to know, and more! This might give you some pointers as to what to tell parents.

 

Maz

Edited by HappyMaz
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I'd definately phone Ofsted and I would put out a letter to parents informing them that :'a case of measles has been diagnosed in a child who attends the setting, but that the child is progressing well so there is no undue need for concern at this time.However if parents ARE concerned, here is the advice from HPA (they should be able to give you a letter to hand out to every family)' and then give some info about the symptoms etc.You may need to get the permission of the affected childs parents to give out any information, even though, obviously, you will not tell anyone who the child is............................we had a child with Meningitis and had to follow all the above procedure.There were no further cases and of course, every other family wanted to know who it was, but we were very good at keeping it quiet and all was well, thank goodness. I suspect we're all likely to see at least one case of measles before too much longer, so it's probably a good idea to have information to hand. I hope this is an isolated case and the child recovers quickly

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thanks everyone for the advice. As you can imagine today has been quite busy. In case anyone else needs to know this is what we did ... it seems to have been the right thing to do so far

Firstly we spoke to our Local Authority and informed them - they talked us through all our policies and procedures and made sure everything was in order and all correct (as Ofsted would want to know). We then spoke to the HPA and reported it to them - they, in turn contacted the family involved and gave them lots of support. We then printed off and copied the details from NHS direct which were very clear and informative. We then phoned parents one by one starting with the children who had been in Nursery when the child concerned was contagious. We decided to phone as letters would take 24 hours to reach families and that might be valuable time for some children. We gave parents the web link to NHS direct and offered to give them a copy of the printed page if they wanted it. Once the most vunerable children's families had been contacted we then informed Ofsted. We waited to contact Oftsed as we decided we need to give parents as much time as possible to act. When we phoned Ofsted we explained the situation and said we were in the process of contacting parents, we also had to explain our infection control procedure. So far all parties seem to think we have done the right thing.

Incidently, the child concerned is recovering well.

Thanks again

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Well done but Im bothered by the doctors attitude, if measles wasnt serious we wouldnt be trying to eradicate with vaccination, would we?

It may be minor for some children but I would be very upset to find my child was one of the unlucky ones. On the other hand, of course, it is because I feel like that that nmy children were vaccinated so wouldnt be at risk!

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Well done but Im bothered by the doctors attitude, if measles wasnt serious we wouldnt be trying to eradicate with vaccination, would we?

It may be minor for some children but I would be very upset to find my child was one of the unlucky ones. On the other hand, of course, it is because I feel like that that nmy children were vaccinated so wouldnt be at risk!

 

Susan,

we had a case reported at preschool in a vaccinated child.. much milder than if she were not vaccinated but she still caught it, as did her sibling.

 

 

(BTW my son was vaccinated so often for measles, as he was born before MMR so had the single 2 dose vaccination, then had MMR as it had just been introduced as his 4 year old vaccination, then had it again at 7 a single dose as there was an outbreak at his school so all were revaccinated..

 

And mumps well he had mumps then MMR and then avoided just avoided another at UNI when there was an outbreak..)

 

At least they dont all have the smallpox one I did as a child, leaving a scar on your arm ..although mine has actually disappeared.

 

Inge

Edited by Inge
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I never got the chicken pox as a child, neither did my twin brother, but my 2 other siblings did. My son never had it either, someone once said we were carriers. :o I had a mild dose of shingles in my early twenties (ouch) prior to having my son.

 

Peggy

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My daughter had measles 2 weeks before she was due for the injection.Sky high temperature and emergancy doctor but she came through it ok.She was just recovering nicely when the appointment card dropped through the letter box.

 

My worry would have been for newly expectant mums (who you may not know were pregnant). I think you did right contacting parents first. I hope their reactions were ok.

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I never got the chicken pox as a child, neither did my twin brother, but my 2 other siblings did. My son never had it either, someone once said we were carriers. :o I had a mild dose of shingles in my early twenties (ouch) prior to having my son.

 

Peggy

 

I thought if you've had shingles that means you have had Chicken Pox? xD Perhaps it was so mild that you didn't even notice!

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All the responses from parents have been supportive but also quite rightly concerned about the implications for their own children. I guess the local doctors have had lots of phone calls!!! The parents are grateful that they they have been contacted individually as it's meant they can talk through the issues personally with the manager (this has meant about 3 days on the 'phone tho'). Ofsted have asked for written confiration of our report to them which does (I think) show that they are taking it seriously. It seems that measles in a vaccinated child is much much less of a worry than measles in an un-vaccinated child. The child concerned was vaccinated but is too young to have had the booster (first vaccination gives 90% immunity). The child has been unwell for 10 days now - hopefully will be better soon. Thanks all for concern

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