Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Top Places To Take Minded Children


 Share

Recommended Posts

Parent and toddler groups/Childminding Support groups -

Great places to take children along to socialise with other children of a similar age, meet children they may one day meet at school. Often an opportunity to join in a group activity - caft, singing, drink time etc.

 

The Shops

Visit small shops to but one or two items to use in an activity - choose fruit from a farm shop to make a fruit salad, or point out how the till is used/computer at the bank and show technology in the real world.

The Park

Lot of space to run around, practice skills of balancing, climbing, jumping, swining, discovers the child's physical capabilities....

 

Public transport

Go on a bus or train ride - fits in well with a transport topic, under fives are often free, and many children today have not had this experience. My two year olds love it... we ride to the next station and back, some days we don't even get off!!

 

 

 

Can you list some more ideas.... where is the best place you had been???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Puddleducks -

This is an interesting subject. We recently had our combined ofsted inspection, and the one recommendation we had was that we should introduce some 'outings' which we don't currently do.

 

However, when we mentioned this to a couple of parents, their reaction was horror. Their opinion was that they brought their children to our nursery because they'd had a good look round and thought their children would be safe in this environment.

 

Now we're telling them we might be taking them out and about? The inspector mentioned that we could even take them to Tesco. One parent thought this was hilarious. Her child hated tesco so much that she used the time he was at our nursery to do some shopping in peace. She had visions of doing the shopping in Tesco and bumping into her child anyway...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think as a child minder it is perhaps more important that the children go out and about than for pre-schools and nurseries to take them on trips. If they are with a childminder for most of the day, most of the week etc. they may not be getting the opportunities at home to visit places they would normally. Going shopping I think is an important part of growing up whether we as parents enjoy taking them or not. They can learn so much and it can be a positive experience.

One of our best outings at pre-school was when we were doing all about me and looking at where we lived. On a 1 to 2 basis we took the children on a mini treasure hunt. We walked a safe route around the local area looking for such things a house with a budgie in its cage in the window, a garden with gnomes in it, a shop with a frog fishing etc. Beforehand I scrounged 40 something carrier bags from our local Spa and named one for each child. At home they had to make a shopping list and bring it in with £1. As we did our walk we stopped in the shop and they made their purchases. They thought it was wonderful!!

Linda

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i agree that it is important as a childminder to provide children with what we would call everyday tasks ,such as the post office, bank ,supermarket etc. they learn so much(i won`t list i haven`t got an hour!)but it is also just a part of homelife which some children don`t get to experience.

i think in a nursery setting it is different and i can imagine parents not being impressed.thinking that their children were missing out on nursery time.

maddy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi

 

The 1st time i organised a trip i was a nervous wreck!! (I do stress that we only do trips with accompanying parents unless they are working - then as long as they can get the children to the venue and i have enough staff we will take charge of their children but only on a one to one basis)

 

Now i love it and so do all of the children and most of the mums. :)

 

Up until this term we had only done a trip to Cheeky Charlies, picnic in the park and a boat trip which is now anual. xD

 

As some of you know this half term we went to Lego land and it was fab (all the children were accompanied by parents so although staff had groups for workshops and parents waited outside for them at all other times the parents were in charge. I have to say staff did seem to enjoy themselves on all the rides borrowing children to do so!!!! :D

 

It takes a bit of organising these outings but it makes such a change - although someone did mention Chessington next time!!!! :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I chose my childminder (many moons ago now, long before they had to go though OFSTED) on the basis of my child(ren) getting what they would miss out on while I was working. I wanted a "home from home".

 

I wanted them to be able to count the socks as they came out of the washing machine (and to match them into pairs). I wanted them to go to Tesco, get the shopping, help unpack it, put it away in the right place. All those normal activities. Oh heavens, this sounds awful. What I mean is that I wanted them to learn things in a friendly home environment.

 

And with my childminder, my girls had a super time. It was important to me that they did the ordinary, everyday things (that I had to do after they had gone to bed). They also did things that I would have liked to do with them - and did when I had the chance - walking round the village, visiting people. I didn't want the chilminder to take them on extensive, expensive outings - there was no need for that.

 

My childminder was amazing. My children were happy with her and loved her to bits (they still do - and my oldest is 17). Unfortunately she gave up childminding when threatened with more than social services regulation. This was a great loss to the local community. She was doing everything right. It was the best example of "parents in partnership" that I have ever come across. She always asked the right questions about my girls and acted on what I told her.

 

Children don't need complex things organised to keep them happy and interested. In childminding (and in full day care, I presume), they need love, care, attention, and enough going on to progress them in life and learning.

 

All I can say is that childminders cannot go far wrong (from a parent's perspective) if they give their minded children exactly what they would give their own children.

 

Diane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

diane i totally agree. as a childminder i was proud to offer a home from home enviroment. children love helping around the house. what starts as a job of putting washing in the mashine ends in a empty wash basket thats a boat or a car.

 

the children in my care have always been offered the same experiences that my own children get , i try hard for that to be as much as possible.the children i look after have just enjoyed watching their "secret " bulbs they planted in my garden grow and flower, they loved it!

 

I did feel when i had my ofsted inspection that it was to formal .the questions didn`t reflect real life ,we might spend all of a nice day on the park with a picnic or a bad day curled up on the settee with the blanket watching videos and dunking biscuits . I didn`t feel able to say that. as nice as the inspector was i couldn`t say the day before we made mud pies and i had to hose the children down before i would go anywhere near them!

what i think i`m trying to say is ,i think childminding is unique in that as long as the chilren are safe in a fun and loving enviroment then that should be ok.

 

maddy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maddy,

 

You are right. Learning is all about the right place and the right time.

 

My eldest (now 17) was not with a childminder, she was at home with me (or with my mum occasionally). As a tiny baby she needed lots of "input", lots of talking, lots of contact. As a new mum, those many moons ago, I knew that my baby was only happy when she had someone willing to give her attention.

 

Oh, gosh, I drew the short straw, three children that never slept during the day - and one that never slept at night either.

 

When the other two were little they did everything with me (in the baby carrier mostly) but the childminder took over quite early on. And didn't she do it so well. She gave them everything that I would have wanted to give them myself.

 

Even my youngest who has speech problems (now nearly 10) has a tremendous general knowledge (school remark upon this). Why? Because of the input from me and the childminder.

 

Proper childminders do the right things (we all know).

 

Diane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes Diane I quite agree with you. Children do need a home enviroment helping doing all the mundane chores can be fun to a little one. I have been a registered childminder for 25years. I can honestly sat that apart from the necessary shopping trips the only outings that I only take minded children to are the park or the woods.I am lucky because there are lots of small holdings nearby within walking distance. Often the animals visit us though. We have had 2 large pigs in the garden over the last 2 weeks.It is not uncommon to see a cow or two in the garden either. I live on a bridleway so horses are trotting by all the time. I did resent the last inspector asking me why on earth I wanted to look after children in the afternoon as well as the morning at pre-school. I think I provide an excellant service. Children can interact with others during the morning and then have a quieter afternoon at home with me playing ,helping me with household chores or maybe just chilling out and chatting. I didn't tell her that I let children climb the large trees in my wood and encourage them to help me gather sticks so we can all watch a bonfire burning. or that I encourage the children to have water fights or that I let them play with slime in the bath.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

bubblejack, don`t you find that when you are doing all these fun things with the children that you stop for a minute and realize that your having loads of fun too!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maddy yes I do have fun I just love life. I do all these things for myself really. I am not a very materialistic person really. I don't like retail therapy I would rather do the things that God gave us. to enjoy I think children are much nicer than some adults .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi All

I would just like to add my heart felt praise for childminders. I have just had to stop sending my daughter regularly as she has started full time school and I feel bereft.

 

She had the most fantastic time because she became a part of the childminder's family with brothers and sisters that she doesn't otherwise have and I'm sure her social skills are so good because of this rather than what I have done.

 

What I also loved was the fact that she was taken to the park, library, local shops, post office, the local school to watch country dancing etc. In otherwords all the things that I would have done if I could have been there.

 

We'll still see her on INSET days, but I shall really miss her. She's been a second mum to my daughter....and me.

 

Keep up the good work everyone. You're FAB :D:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A big round of applause for bubblejack and all the other lovely childminders, please!!!

 

The "learning at home" is what I wanted from my childminder. If I was not there to do it myself, I wanted the next best thing. And I certainly got it (maybe better).

 

Pre-school in the morning (when old enough, and bless my childminder - she took them to toddler group, messy play, childminding circle in the mornings, before they were old enough for pre-school), childminder at home in the afternoon. Mine, when they were little, had childminder's mum dropping in (surrogate granny - they still call her 'Nanny Marge'). Normal things. Trips to the recreation ground. Tesco. Collecting children from school. Walks to the post office. And so on .....

 

And also bless my childminder for this - she used to take loads of photos (because she was having fun, I suspect), and many of them found their way to me when my children left her care.

 

Although I felt I was missing out on lots of things, my children are evidence that they had the next best thing to home.

 

Childminders, you are doing a very valued job, please don't let OFSTED push you in the wrong direction. Mums at home with children don't work to ELG's. They go with the flow. As a mum, I wanted my children in EY education before they started school - but not for 6 or 8 hours a day. Childminders are not day nurseries. Childminders give the learning at home environment that doesn't happen in any institution.

 

Diane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
A big round of applause for bubblejack and all the other lovely childminders, please!!!

 

The "learning at home" is what I wanted from my childminder.  If I was not there to do it myself, I wanted the next best thing.  And I certainly got it (maybe better).

 

Pre-school in the morning (when old enough, and bless my childminder - she took them to toddler group, messy play, childminding circle in the mornings, before they were old enough for pre-school), childminder at home in the afternoon.  Mine, when they were little, had childminder's mum dropping in (surrogate granny - they still call her 'Nanny Marge'). Normal things. Trips to the recreation ground.  Tesco.  Collecting children from school.  Walks to the post office.  And so on .....

 

And also bless my childminder for this - she used to take loads of photos (because she was having fun, I suspect), and many of them found their way to me when my children left her care.

 

Although I felt I was missing out on lots of things, my children are evidence that they had the next best thing to home.

 

Childminders, you are doing a very valued job,  please don't let OFSTED push you in the wrong direction.  Mums at home with children don't work to ELG's.  They go with the flow.  As a mum, I wanted my children in EY education before they started school - but not for 6 or 8 hours a day.  Childminders are not day nurseries.  Childminders give the learning at home environment that doesn't happen in any institution.

 

Diane.

7516[/snapback]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I haven't been online for a while... but I have loved reading the messages above... I feel childminders today are really in a tight situation and yeah, what do the parents want - a fun home from home flexible frindly enviroment. The descriptions and memories were lovely to read.

 

It is the little things that count!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)