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Good And Bad Experiences In Training


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Hi all, I'm about to start tutor training. The first assignment asks us to think about good and bad experiences in training. I can think of both, but would like to hear other peoples experineces to.

My bad one relates to 'Believing in your subject'.

 

At an Equal ops course we were asked to think about the books we provide. Are they reflective of our multi-cultural society? Do they show positive images of all people? Do the images dispel steryotypes?

The lady leading said...

'To check this, ask a member of staff to review the library books. You might have only one male member of staff, lets call him Tom. Tom wont want to sit in the staff room listening to women talking so give him the job' :o

 

Thats where I and the man sitting next to me (the only one in the room!!), stopped listening. xD

 

Any comments you'd be willing to share would be helpful, thanks :D:D

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One comment that I would make is that I always switch off if I attend training by a tutor who apparently disregards anything that any of the course participants have to contribute; the tutor obviously knows their stuff but does nothing to help participants relate that knowledge to their own lives and practice and seems more happy to make sure everyone knows what an expert he/she is on the subject.

 

Training is so much more enjoyable when you can get involved in discussions which bring the subject matter to life and relate it to situations that you yourself really know about and have experienced day to day. It's always said isn't it that you're likely to learn as much from other people on the course as from the tutor themselves? Is that the sort of comment that you're after? :o

Edited by Wolfie
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Generally what really annoys me at any training courses is some of the other people attending. A small number of people generally dominate the discussions, giving little opportunity for others to join in and have a say. These are the people that often need the training most but they are also the people who listen the least. xD Then there are the ones that just love to bring the subject back to them and their experiences all the time, even when it is irrelevant to what the tutor is saying. :(

 

In terms of the tutors themselves, the ones that I don't like are those that offer the training in a very dry manner - monotone voice reading from notes or slides. Two hours of someone droning on at you is very boring and since I am more than capable of reading I wonder what their role actually is! :o

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My pet hate is the tutor who puts up an OHP, gives us the same as a handout and then proceeds to read the OHP to everyone - WHAT A WASTE OF TIME!!! They might as well have posted the handout to me and I could have stayed at home! :o (Ooh, I was ranting there, sorry.......)

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Oooh yes, LJW, I agree - hadn't thought of that one! What IS the point!

 

The best training course that I've ever been on was run by Helen Bromley - she does loads about Outdoor Play, Literacy, etc. etc. I've been trying to think what it was that made it so good and have put it down to the fact that her enthusiasm for the subject was so infectious and engaging. I could have listened to her for a week - and brought back to the nursery so many simple ideas that were easy to implement.

 

That's another difference between good and bad training - I hate it when you come away with nothing to help develop/improve your everyday practice, I feel I've wasted my time if there's nothing for me to implement or try out.

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The BTTM course I went on was horrendous. The tutor came across as very aggressive and cowed us all into submission. If you answered a question wrong she was very dismissive and belittling, then wondered why no one wanted to answer her questions! The tutor was also very contradictory with her anecdotes, one minute she was praising her own childminder who had 'fully embraced' BTTM then she was telling us how she always throws away their arts & crafts because she knew the childminder 'had directed their hands'. We all left that course feeling we got nothing out of it.

The best courses I've been on were, as Wolfie said, ones run by tutors whose 'enthusiasm for the subject was so infectious and engaging'.

Funny how easy it is to pinpoint the bad points yet so hard to verbalise the good points, or is that just me?

Karrie

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Interaction, I find that if you are encouraged to interact and join in with the training you remember it better and may actually implement some of it, just sitting and listening seems to switch off the memory and gets forgotten.

eg in literacy training had interactive sessions including rap, dance, rhythm, listening, music etc. (so much so the group in the room next door came and complained asking us to reduce the noise!!)

Others may not like the interacting and have a young newish member of staff who was very wary about going to a short literacy session having heard what it may involve, but on her return was so enthusiastic and has implemented a lot of it herself.

 

not good was our NVQ training. she sat behind a table reading from the suggested text. That was it!! we were not even told how to reference or cross reference any evidence until 1 month before it was due in!!!! we all had files of paperwork and did not know what to do with it!!

 

Evaluating the session, one tutor gave everyone a stick-it note, asked for our opinions to the session, what ever it was good and bad, saying that it helped her plan better ways of giving the training, these were then stuck on a wall outside the room as you left, that way she had no idea who had given what feed back. Next session she commented on some of them and said she had changed her training according to the needs of our group. No one ever knew who had made the suggestions or comments.

 

really dislike those ones with set questions to answer, with things like tick boxes and what will you do with the training questions ... I know they need to be done but always say the same thing unless it is really bad or good.

 

ensuring content is up to date and relevant ....and not the same every time.... we have been encouraged to repeat our child protection training... ok we all agree a refresher would be useful... only to find that the content has not changed in the 3 years... so much so that we all knew the scenarios given had the information already and totally switched off from it... waste of time and money for all ......

 

as said before deviation from the topic ... often started by a attendee but not turned back to the subject by the tutor, who should be aware and hopefully able to turn it around. discussion is good if relevant and also allows the tutor to move things on, not just get taken around in circles by those attending.

 

 

probably lots more but that's it for now

 

Inge

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Best thing about training is the hands on, doing it in groups or discussing it in groups relating it to your own experiences, oh and the lunches!!!!!

 

Worse thing is, as already mentioned reading out OHP notes which are already in front of you, but even worse is telling you that they have printed out all OHP notes for you so you do not need to make notes but not giving you the hand out until the end- so you can not add any other notes which come out of discussions etc.

 

I also personally hate the aggressive lecturer who picks on people for examples. I always feel sorry for the person they pick on if they get the wrong answer!

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Have to say I'm with LJW on this one I really hate someone standing at the front reading what I have in my hand. Do they think I can't read?

 

Don't attend any training in Surey, then!!

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yes beau has made a valid point about people who take over on training course but i have also been on course where if i didnt speak up and answer questions nobody would bother!!!As they are there cos they want time off or the venue does a good lunch!!

I have often thought though i bet they are fed up of my voice but i believe a course is what you make it and my having an input it makes it more personable to your experiences.Saying that there have been a few people ive wanted to gag too!! :oxD

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Definately being able to sound off ideas with other people.

Relevant information and resources. I sometimes sit in training and wonder what I am there for as the course content doesn't reflect what is going on.

I hate getting to know one another/ice breaker games!!!!!!! If it is a one off course which only lasts about 3/4 hours I feel these are such a waste of time. And if you are going to be there any length of time, say a few weeks, then you will get to know one another any way.

I was on a fire fighting course last Saturday and the guy didn't even ask us to introduce ourselves-which was good because I can't remember their names anyway and why would I need to know them?

And as others have mentioned, not keeping control of the session so that we end up talking about what we all had for dinner last night!!! :oxD

Linda

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My pet hate is the tutor who puts up an OHP, gives us the same as a handout and then proceeds to read the OHP to everyone - WHAT A WASTE OF TIME!!! They might as well have posted the handout to me and I could have stayed at home! :o (Ooh, I was ranting there, sorry.......)

 

To put across a different point of view on this one.. . trainers have to consider the different learning styles of those they are training. Some people are auditorty learners and like to have things read out to them - usually at the annoyance of other delegates!

 

I've just done a quick search and found this link (No idea where it's from but the quiz is good fun - I'm a kinesthetic learner!)

 

I don't like trainers that are constantly on the move - it gives me a headache.

I also despise ice-breakers.

I don't like trainers that stick rigidly to their lesson plans and cut off really interesting discussions as 'we have to move on now' - I know how children feel at tidy up time when this happens!!

 

When I deliver training, I make sure that there is some calmer time (almost chalk and talk training) with the trainer at the front and delegates listening, with a mix of group activities that is related to the training (replacing the icebreaker and not isolating people), small group discussions (pairs) and whole group feedback opportunities. That way, there is the chance for those with opinions to join in but not necessarily dominate and for the quieter ones to engage in pairs and small groups but sit back and listen in the large groups.

 

Evaluations half way through a day long course tend to help sometimes it becomes evident that the needs/interests of the group are slightly different to what is actually planned , or may come from backgrounds that require specialist support (childminders for example) so you can tailor the afternoon session to be even more specific for the group of delegates.

 

I too like a trainer that is passionate about their subject and makes it feel 'real' by adding anecdotes of real life events - Helen Bromley is very good at this, as someone else has already stated, as are Jenny Mosley and Ros Bayley.

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courses that are relevant to the people on them. I gone on so many courses that just have the same old things said, and show you the same old things that can be done with the children. We have tried to tell our LEA that we want new content to the courses, otherwise the "old timers" nod off to sleep. Even the enthusiam of the new comers doesn't get you excited.

We have quoted the old saying "don't teach your grandmother to suck eggs" a few times.

They have at last come up with training sessions that are relevant to the people on them and to separate the more experienced practioners from the new ones or less experienced.

 

We went on a Saturday morning course a few weeks ago that was very hands on, making and building things and all new ideas.

It was really great and the Cream cakes at half time helped alot as well. Also a decent cup of coffee.!!!!!!! :oxD

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Runningbunny I agree everyone has different learning styles but surely they don't need to read out the handout. I don't mind a bit of chalk and talk but really switch off as soon as they start reading word for word what is in front of me. They must be able to present the spoken part in a more interesting way than a number of bullet points in a voice that seems to ask "are you are bored as I am?"

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Oh, don't get me wrong, I'm not advocating that style of training.... just putting across a different perspective.

 

It may just be by reading out the bullet points it acts as a prompt to a story or tale about something that is relevant but it may also not be the case and they are just poor trainers and think that they are actually 'teaching' you something! :o

 

I guess that's where our Britishness lets us down and we don't always provide that kind of feedback to the trainer - let's start a campaign to be honest on evaluations and to stop trainers reading out the handouts word for word :D

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Guest MaryEMac

I suffer from panic attacks at times and when I have been on training courses where the trainer reads from the OHP, I start to get fidgety and hot and plan my escape if I feel faint. I much prefer courses where the instructor gets you involved and you don't have time to daydream. I'm booked on the advanced BTTM in a few weeks and have heard that the trainer picks on people to answer questions. I am really dreading it, I probably do know the answer but I am worried about looking stupid. Silly I know but that is how I am.

 

Mary

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i have started being very honest on my feedback forms-there's no point otherwise as if they think they are doing an ok job they will carry on in that vein.

A couple of years back I went on a designated person child protection course. They asked us what we wanted to get out of the session and I said that I wanted to know exactly what happened after I had referred a child I felt was at risk. What was my role going to be? At the end of the course I felt that I had done a basic CP course, learnt nothing new and didn't have my questions answered. I put this on the feedback form. I'm hoping when I go next time things will be different.

Linda

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Can't bear to comment on feedback or course evaluation forms!!! (I do admit they have a purpose tho). I have problems with coffee breaks on a short course. Sometimes I wish we could just keep going and then leave 10 minutes early...... It depends on who's delivering the course! Something that seems to work well is when 2 people who work together deliver the training so you are not just listening to one person all the time.

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As somebody who occasionally delivers training as well, I also much prefer it when I am "co-presenting" - it means we can illustrate points from different angles and give more personal anecdotes; it also means we have two sets of personal experiences and that means that course participants have a better chance of relating what we are saying to their situation.

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agree breaks in short courses are irritating.... didnt think of that one as must admit our LEA start session with refreshments and during discussion times they are usually available too, seems a more 'adult' way of giving refreshments,(mm isnt that what we do with the children?).

 

like .... 15mins at end unplanned time for interaction and informal discussion between those attending if they want it or they can leave if they want....gives time to meet up with anyone you need to see or have not seen in a while!

 

Inge

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I believe that the trainer needs to find out the starting point of where the people on the course are, and then be flexible to take the training in whatever direction is relevant. Obviously this is hard if people are all at different levels.

 

I have been on 2 completely different courses recently, and both asked us at the start what we wanted to achieve from the training. They then went back and checked that we hade achieved what we wanted to, and if there were still unanswered questions, they were addressed.

Edited by Guest
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I'm in the middle of a two day course run by Marion Dowling at the moment -with a four week break between the two days - and she got us to each write down on a post it note the one thing that we really wanted to get out of the course and the one issue that concerned us most; she said she would look at them all between the two days and make sure that everyone's points had been covered by the end of the second day if they hadn't already.

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I enjoy any hands-on courses, with lots of practical activities and things that you can take back and use 'in the real world'. I know there's a place for the theory behind things, but sometimes the theory takes up half the time. I also hate filling in evaluation forms - I never know what to say, and generally end up being really bland.

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Just what I was thinking Wolfie, God help any tutors out there this week!! :oxD

 

Thanks for the link RB. I'll do that later :D

 

 

I did this questionaire and was also kinesthetic C:\Users\Dave\Desktop\DEGREE\VARK quiz.htm, however on RB's one I came out as an auditory learner.

 

As a tutor I have used OHP's or powerpoint presentations with bullet points to 'prompt' my presentation, however I create this with a mix of text and pictures to try and make it more interesting and use it as a starting point for discussion or to give factual information such as a list of legislation which can be filed for reference (handout). I don't read out this sort of info.

 

My bad experience of training was when on an equal opps course I was asked to carry out an activity which required me to make discriminatory judgements....a sinking ship, who would you save type scenario. I refused to participate ( my line manager was my tutor and was not impressed) I tried to explain that It wasn't because I didn't understand the task but that I could not descriminate between one person or another. It got very heated and I was expected to pretend to be disciminatory to do the task, again I refused......it was a weekend long course and as this was the first excersise the whole weekend was very difficult because I stood up to my principles. On feedback I said the course content was behind the times, I knew the purpose of te task but felt that as practitioners we hd moved on from such blatant discriminatory thoughts and a this task should be updated to the 'real' world. The course was never run again after my complaint.

 

I agree it is important to tutor at the right level of students knowledge base.

 

I remember a good piece of advice given to me once about ensuring important items are remembered it's also what journalists do;

state what you are going to say,

say it

then state what you have just said.

these can be done using different styles of presentation but re-inforces info. same with activities

say what you are going to do

do it

state what you have just done.

 

These I do through stating session aims and objectives then revueing the at the end with the students, allowing time to clarify any queries or points of discussions.

 

I think it is good if tutors conclude discussions by stating ( repeating) valid points that have been made.

 

One tutor I enjoyed was an ex Ofsted Inspector who then became an Ofsted advisor/consultant trainer, her name evades me at the mo. Her enthusiasm, she wasn't patronising, she maintained a good pace relevant to student group and content and we did brain gym after lunch :D

 

As a tutor I really take notice of feedback / evaluations and I am disappointed if sections of the form are answered with innate words such as 'good' , 'enjoyed' I like to receive constructive critisism. I also allow enough time for these to be completed.

I always ask what main thing did you learn today, what did you want to learn more about.

 

Good luck with your course Rea, I am sure you will make a great tutor.

 

Peggy

 

 

C:\Users\Dave\Desktop\DEGREE\VARK quiz.htm,

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