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As you know - when I joined my nursery, I was staggered to find a blank policy file (well actually, NO policy file!).

 

The staff are very good at taking temperatures, but have no idea what the procedure is if the temperature is high.

 

I have been trying to seek advice from various parties all day - all of whom give out very different advice.

 

What are your procedures, e.g. at what temp do you ring parents? at what temp do you seek medical help?

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I have never taken a child's temperature in my life.............not even my own.Generally, if they feel hot to your touch and are feeling unwell, send them home is my motto!I'd phone the parent and simply say that "X is under the weather, and feeling poorly, please come and collect asap"

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We would ring parents if a child was obviously unwell and body feels hot to the touch (dont really go round checking temperature usually go by judgement/experience) but if unsure normal temperature is 36-36.8ºC (97.7-99.1ºF). using a mouth or ear thermometer think its slightly different with those brow strips but they have instructions

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we also would not take childrens temperatures (advised against this in last first aid course we did) but assess the child as a whole, temperature either raised or lowered is only part of the picture, and we would assess each child on changes to behaviour, listlessness, tiredness, general well being etc. If at all worried we would contact the parents to collect, if worried about child being very hot we would remove clothing and keep them cool to try to reduce this, if really worried we would contact or seek medical help but would contact parents and keep them informed first. Most times parents arrive when you call and we would suggest they seek medical help if we are concerned about child.

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Just looked on the BUPA web-site and it says to seek medical advice if:

 

the temperature rises above 38.9°C in children or 38°C in a baby under one year

 

The Health Visitor who I spoke to today said between 38 and 39, so this seems to fit

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We do not take temperatures either, just touch to guage an increase in temperature, and as others have said other visual signs, and unusual behaviour, then straight on the phone before the child becomes too unwell.

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our policy is that if a childs temp is 38 then parents must be informed and asked to collect them. in the mean time we give plenty of liquids and sponge the child down. If a childs temp will not come down and goes higher then we can give emergency calpol, but have to phone the parents first to gain verbal consent ( the parents sign a form upon entry to nursery stating the understand this procedure and give their consent) and parents still have to pick them up. if this fails to bring down the childs temp then and ambulance would be called. xjojomx

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Hi all

 

Interesting discussion. I really don't think that we should be in the realms of taking a child's temperature - if it is high a child will be showing other obvious signs of being unwell and the parent should be called in to collect them - we are not medical practitioners. As for giving a non prescription medicine one of our staff went on a First Aid course recently and informed that we should not administer any non prescription drugs such as calpol even with a parents permission. Prescription drugs should have explicit instructions from the parent or when applicable, training from a doctor or nurse (e.g. to administer epipen or rectal diazapan etc.)

 

SueT

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our policy is that if a childs temp is 38 then parents must be informed and asked to collect them. in the mean time we give plenty of liquids and sponge the child down. If a childs temp will not come down and goes higher then we can give emergency calpol, but have to phone the parents first to gain verbal consent ( the parents sign a form upon entry to nursery stating the understand this procedure and give their consent) and parents still have to pick them up. if this fails to bring down the childs temp then and ambulance would be called. xjojomx

 

 

The lastest recommendations are not to try to bring the temperature down.

 

"Most fevers are caused by infection or other illness. Fever helps the body fight infections by stimulating natural defence mechanisms."

 

http://www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk/articles/artic...?ArticleId=1633

 

 

Hi all

 

As for giving a non prescription medicine one of our staff went on a First Aid course recently and informed that we should not administer any non prescription drugs such as calpol even with a parents permission. Prescription drugs should have explicit instructions from the parent or when applicable, training from a doctor or nurse (e.g. to administer epipen or rectal diazapan etc.)

 

SueT

 

We dont give non perscription drugs either.

Edited by Marion
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Interesting discussion...

 

We do give calpol in event of high temperatures, children being unwell... all parents sign a consent form for this upon admission, and i always phone parents to say i am going to give calpol.

 

stupid tho, that we can give calpol but can't put a plaster on a cut??? ~ where is the logic in that.

 

Dawn

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  • 4 weeks later...

If a child in our setting is behaving unusually, whining, wanting more support than normal, looking hot and flushed, lying down and looking sleepy, the staff talk to the child, feel the child, and visually inspect the child, if we are still concerned we would ring parent and chat about our concerns, most then come and collect the child, occasionally other explanations are put forward for the child not appearing themselves. If when we are inspecting the child we suspect a temperature we would use a fever scan to allow us to alert the parents to a raised temperature and ask them to collect the child. A few times a child comes in fine, later in a morning a child goes down hill, and when talked to tells us someone gave it calpol before they came to nursery. We never give non-perscription medicine, such as calpol, if a chld needs calpol they should not be in nursery. J

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