Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Giant Snails


cathyuhu
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

bit of an odd one but sure someone will know.....does anyone know where we stand with having giant land snails in the classroom (in a tank obviously, not roaming free!) I remember hearing that they carried salmonella so children shouldnt handle them...Any thoughts :o ??

Catherine xx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:o i hadn't heard that - we ahve them in our nursery & i know of at least 2 other schools locally which have them (in rec & nursery) too. The chdn don't handle them but do enjoy feeding (or should i say throwing the cucumber into the tank & then watching the snails eat!. :D !!! Will be interested to see what the response to that question is like - we recently had ofsted in & the inspector commented on the snails but in a positive way!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

we hads nails brought in when the zoo visited they allowed the children to hold them on thier hands and touch them under supervision, only requirement was that they then provided hand gel for all children to apply after holding those lovely creatures! ( snails not my thing, give me spiders any day)

 

Inge

 

should read had snails (nails?)

 

Inge

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd agree with that..........one of my daughters has kept them foryears without problems and has brought them into the group for the children to see and handle.The children always scrub their hands afterwards, so there shouldn't be any risk to their health.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the risk would be the same as looking at snails in the garden, as already said washing hands after touching should be enough. We too have been offered snails to hold at The London Butterfly House.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Be careful Catherine, they are both sexes (dont know the official word) so you have to look out for eggs. I've been told they look like small cauliflower florets but cant confirm this. Scoop out the soil and change it every so often. :D

I also had a visit from the zoo people who were happy to let the children handle them with hands being washed afterwards. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They can lay about 200 eggs at a time about once a month when the weather is warm enough, so that's excellent advice, Rea! There's a company that used to take the eggs if you posted them. I think it was called Small Life Supplies or something like that.

 

They hibernate if not kept warm enough & can die, so if you haven't got ideal conditions you might need to think about something like a heat mat over the winter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have giant land snails in our Reception classroom, they are great and the kids love them. They are unlikely to have salmonella if you get them from a good supplier. The children just need to wash their hands carefully if they handle them, just to be on the safe side. The eggs need to go into the freezer for a few days to prevent them from hatching as you have to be very careful you don't release any in to the environment. They are excellent predators and eat anything, breeding very fast, so extremely important that you don't bin the eggs without freezing first. Evidently they are banned in North america because they have become such a menace in the wild, eating everyone's gardens!! We love ours though!!!!!!!

Kellsa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)