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How to develop segmenting skills?


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I have a child who is now in year 1 who still struggles to segment words accurately. He usually manages to get the initial sounds but doesn't get the final one. For example he might say c-a-m instead of cat. If he isn't concentrating he is likely to have difficulty with more of them - maybe getting only the initial sound. This obviously has a big impact on his writing. We reviewed Phase 1 of letters and sounds at the start of his reception year with a big focus on oral segmentation and blending and continued to do this alongside other phases throughout the year. His parents also reinforce this at home - it just isn't sticking!

 

I have some extra TA time which I want to use to support him (and a couple of others) with their phonic skills to help develop their writing ultimately. I'm looking for some fresh ideas and anything would be welcome. Ideally I'd like it to be relatively quick to set up/do as I'm going down the little and often route with them. However, I'm also open to anything which may help - including computer programs/apps.

 

Any and all suggestions gratefully received!

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now your not going to like this answer...because of course phonics is the holy grail...but have you tried just memorising some basic words to get him started ....I know this is an unpopular method but for children who just don't get it it gives them a method of achieving .

Flash card type games maybe the way to go!

 

...I say this as a parent of a child with dyslexia, my daughter never got phonics until year 3/4

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Initial thought, is there any problem with his hearing, is that all OK?

 

Yes, all hearing tests passed with flying colours and no early glue ear type things either! The other day I was getting him to sound talk some pictures of CVC objects that he knew the names of so he wasn't attempting to sound talk from hearing a word that I'd said - he found it difficult.

 

now your not going to like this answer...because of course phonics is the holy grail...but have you tried just memorising some basic words to get him started ....I know this is an unpopular method but for children who just don't get it it gives them a method of achieving .

Flash card type games maybe the way to go!

 

...I say this as a parent of a child with dyslexia, my daughter never got phonics until year 3/4

 

I have no problem with your answer - I do other things alongside the phonics!! Yes, I am giving him some words to just memorise too. It takes a very long time and he doesn't seem to retain them well once he has got them. However, as far as I can tell there are no 'issues' with his memory both short and long term - both from my own observation and conversations with mum.

 

Sometimes when I am working with him there is an expression on his face which makes me feel as if he is thinking 'If I just 'don't know' this eventually someone will just tell me what to do'. I know that sounds terrible. He is also immensely competitive and sometimes I feel as if because he isn't 'winning' straight away with things he gives up straight away. I have tried everything I can think of in terms of making it relevant and interesting to him personally but feel a bit like I'm banging my head against a brick wall as I can't figure out what's going on for him!

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Keep going with everything you are doing, with practise it will hopefully click! Have you tried the phonicsplay website for games? I use them with during phonics and then 1:1 with some of the autistic children in the class, they love them and they are helping with his blending skills. We also have Espresso at school that has been updated with some phonic activities.

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What about his working memory....To enable a child to hear a sequence of sounds, process them and them put them together they need to have an auditory working memory capable of this demand. Can he hold digits in his head and repeat them back or repeat them backwards? Is it just sounds he is struggling with? Is he having trouble processing these sounds with a noisy class environment? Does he need a quieter space for his processing to be uninterrupted? Could you give him visual cards to support the auditory demands?

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Thanks for that Fairyjojo. I'll try to see what he's like repeating numbers back to me. The issue seems to be the same whetherin the noisier classroom or a small phonics group or 1:1 in a quiet room. I'm not sure what you mean by using visual cards to support the auditory demands? I'm willing to try anything!

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If you a

 

Thanks for that Fairyjojo. I'll try to see what he's like repeating numbers back to me. The issue seems to be the same whetherin the noisier classroom or a small phonics group or 1:1 in a quiet room. I'm not sure what you mean by using visual cards to support the auditory demands? I'm willing to try anything!

For example, when asking him to blend S-A-T have the letters sat in front of him, a visual to support his auditory. He could move them closer together as he sounds it or even ask him to begin with which is the first sound he can hear and putting them in the right order...can he then hear and say the word..

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