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Sounds of intent in Early Years


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Sounds of Intent in the Early Years (SoI-EY) is an innovative resource based on pioneering research led by Professor Adam Ockelford, Director of the Applied Music Research Centre at the University of Roehampton, in London. SoI-EY sets out just how childrens minds develop musically, from three months before birth, so that by the time they enter full time education, they are already fledgling young musicians. This new findings mean that, for the first time, it is possible to target activities aimed specifically at individual childrens levels of musical development .

 

 

I attended this on Thursday with little expectation but came away feeling inspired, Prof Adam was great , interesting and the video clips were fab showing how music in Early years and beyond was not only a pleasant pastime but also a way of communicating .

 

He explained how children's brain absorb music and sounds and that you do not need to formalise teaching of music but give opportunity to explore music and sounds throughout your provision.

 

I will post the links to website etc .

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I will be honest and say that music is an area that we do struggle with (yes - another one!). I think it's so important to every area of learning. Staff are afraid of it and how they could 'present it' to young children apart from singing rhymes and bells at Christmas. It's probably our most underused set of resources! Looking forward to finding out more lashes.

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http://soundsofintent.org/about-soi

 

I understand that Isp , my colleagues always struggle too, I have a passion for music and singing especially but this is about introducing and supporting without a great need for musical ability or instruments , using the environment and our voices.

 

Language and musical development are set within those first years , it is easier for children to understand music quicker than language and absorb sounds from the womb and then throughout their early years.

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