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I'm looking for activities and ideas to introduce the EYFS 2012 to my Pre-School Parents?!

What am I trying to get across to them that is different; especially for 3-5's,

 

Thanks

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Have you looked at the document on the Foundation Years website that spells out the changes?

 

Basically, very little is different, some areas of learning have changed names or been split differently - but nothing really radical! You can emphasise the reduction in the number of Goals, but as they are just wider in scope I'm not sure that would really count ;) .

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Haha! Of course. Spoke to the team and i think we are looking at making sure the parents are aware that the 'academics' are not prime areas of learning and help them to understand the reasons why we don't sit and do math calculations and spellings?! We're also going to be looking at partnerships with pre-schools and parents.

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I used to like to get them to make dough and while they were doing it we could tell them the how the children were learning. I made a simple pictoral recipe book for them to follow and then talked them through the area's they were covering, such as the maths involved, the science, the literacy and of course the physical. Most were amazed that something so simple and satisfying could be a learning tool.

We also had collage table, but annoyingly, I used to take things off their picture and move things to where I thought they should go, a tip I picked up years ago, to show how adults interference is most unwelcome!

 

Try it with any activity, it doesnt have to be messy play, afterall, we all know children learn through everything, you just need to get it across to the parents. :1b

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I used to like to get them to make dough and while they were doing it we could tell them the how the children were learning. I made a simple pictoral recipe book for them to follow and then talked them through the area's they were covering, such as the maths involved, the science, the literacy and of course the physical. Most were amazed that something so simple and satisfying could be a learning tool.

We also had collage table, but annoyingly, I used to take things off their picture and move things to where I thought they should go, a tip I picked up years ago, to show how adults interference is most unwelcome!

 

Try it with any activity, it doesnt have to be messy play, afterall, we all know children learn through everything, you just need to get it across to the parents. :1b

 

Oh and do give them some lovely paints etc just let them get really involved with their painting and then yell - OK everyone we're going to come together for a story now! :oxD

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Or do what I've seen done, get them painting, talk about the colours, marks, shapes and patterns and then get them to come and do a worksheet looking at colours, marks, shapes and patterns.

 

Rea - should we set up some training - what d'you think - I reckon we would make quite a 'team'! xD

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Oh yes, bowl into every setting that 'doesnt' and make them 'do'. When I did tutor training we had to write about one good and one bad training experience so we could begin to see how we should work. I've learnt a lot thanks to that!

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A little more seriously; if you wanted, you could point out that the Prime areas are the ones that trigger concerns regarding potential special needs. They are the ones that the under threes should be concentrating on exclusively anyway, so any older children need to be secure in them before we attempt to move them forward.

 

Sue

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