Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Hearing Individual Readers


blackcat
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi wondering how everyone manages to hear children read. Its so important and a good contact with parents but I am struggling to juggle. Anyone got any super ideas they could share. Got a class of 16 children rec/yr1 and yr2 with very little classroom assistant support and no parental help.

 

Thanx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not in KS1 but in my school they just do guided reading in a small group. Then individual readers are listened to by parent helpers. The teacher tries to fit in hearing inidividual children read if they are struggling or not listened to much at home. I think guided reading a powerful way and time efficient way to hear children read.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When my son was in class 2 he got a note sent home about half way through the year to say he was now a competent and independent reader and she would no longer be hearing him read. II expect about half the class got this letter. He still read to parent helper and had guided reading.

 

This year in class 3 the teacher is again hearing reading so go figure.

 

Just an aside, as a parent I didn't know what 'guided reading' meant. and still not entirely sure.

 

Honey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guided reading is when you have a small group of children (up to 6) reading the same book at the same time. They read it at their own individual pace. The teacher plans the session to teach specific reading skills or to focus on a particular element. The children will be of similar ability and needing the same next steps in their learning. The teacher then listens into the children as they read and can support as and when needed. Then you review the book as a group, answering questions etc. It is actually better than individual reading in my opinion because of the thought and planning that goes into it. But children need to be heard read individually at home and at school if time to practise the skills taught in the session.

 

I think its down to the inidividual teacher as to what they do or how they manage the rest of the timetable. x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

missed this first time round.. but local school has volunteer helpers in once a week to listen to the children read, note books to give comments by parents, teacher and volunteer to add to... teacher hears those felt in most need and all at intervals to check..

 

They ask local community and most of them are retired with occasional parent..

 

When my son was learning they had reading club at lunch time once a week, where some of the year 6 heard the younger children read under supervision - they all enjoyed it and as he was shy with adults did better this way this way..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Could you actually ask your parents? You might find they say yes!

 

If my own child's teacher asked specifically, I would happily go in and hear readers (she is lucky and has lots of support already and doesn't need my help).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...or you could adopt the approach that my son's reception teacher has and give every single child an Oxford Reading Tree book with no words in it with a note saying "children will receive a book with words when appropriate".

 

As my son reads ORT stage 5 and many 'real books' at home to us. He (not to mention we) is somewhat baffled by this "baby book" as he describes it.

 

His teacher has never heard him read - even though we told her in Septemebr that he was 'a reader'

 

When I taught reception (10 years ago) I had boxes of books sorted into different 'levels' - they were a mix of 'real books', non fiction books, reading scheme books etc Children were guided towards one box (that I had assessed to be about right), however if a child took a 'hard' book (from a different box) because it really captured their imagination it went home in their book bag with a note ' a book to share' or a comforting easy read went home with a note 'an old favourite for you to listen to' written in their reading record. I did guiding reading as well (as described in earlier posts.)

 

I'm not up to speed with reading in Reception classes but what is happening in my son's class just doesn't feel right? My son wants to read, likes to read to his teddy so reads to us as home "So I can read it myself to Teddy later" A book with no words must be appropriate for some children - those who have had little book experience, who need to get the hang of what the pictures are doing etc etc but to me this it seemed really lazy on behalf of the teacher - tell me I'm wrong!?

 

Sorry to hijack the post but I do want to know (before I talk to the teacher and make a complete **** of myself if this is best practice!)

 

thankyou

pwx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh dear purplewednesday1 - that doesn't sound right at all. Have you spoke to the teacher? I'm a reception teacher and i place a huge emphasis on teaching children to read. I listen to all the children in a guided reading session once a week and then play phonics reading games throughout the week. I only have 2 children out of my class of 30 who are not able to read simple CVC words. The children take a reading book matched their reading level home once a week, and then they have 'choice books' which are for parents to share with their children.

 

My school implemented reading buddies this year from year 1 to year 6. Each year group is paired with another year group, they are then put into pairs to read to each other. Year 1 and year 6 are doing this everyday for 10-15 minutes after lunch and it has been hugely beneficial. The little ones really look up to their reading buddy and the year 6 have even brough in stickers to give their buddy when they do good reading!

 

I put a note out to my parents asking if they'd be interested in helping in class listening to readers or playing alongside the children and I had 5 parents come back saying they'd love to so def worth asking! You can give parents suitable activities with children depending on their skills. x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Smacks of no coherent strategic overview of the teaching of reading in the school if you ask me.

 

Cx

 

 

How right you are, however not complaining as yr3 teacher needs lots of support (awkward disposition). And lots of consolidation going on with this class.

 

On another note, when I hear Class 1 read, the teacher has instructed parents not to add comments more than, 'Fred read to page 12', as there has been a complaint from a parent re a comment made by a parent helper in reading record. Now we write comments on post its. In class 3 - could write anything. More in-coherence? Is it really such a bad thing though?

 

Honey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

I teach in year 2 and in response to not having time to hear children read, I felt exactly the same. I found I needed something more than guided reading so I now invite the children (and their parents if they wish) into class 15 minutes earlier than the offiicial school day begins so that I can hear children read individually. I know that many of them read at home frequntly but felt that I needed to hear them more so that I had a clearer idea of where they were at. this was a joint ks1 decision so reception and yr 1 do the same but use the time slot for different reasons e.g. speakign with parents and allowing chn the allocated time to play games with the parents and settle into class.

Kathryn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)