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Stimulating Setting


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Hey guys,

Haven't posted for a while but always here to get tips. Well I have completed my NQT year and now have my wings so to speak! I have been given nursery to run from september, and I an delighted. However our foundation stage is having a massive overhaul by a new phase leader (who has never worked in early years) she is energetic and enthusiastic and just what the foundation stage needs. Phase leader is looking at chancging everything paper work wise and thats fine by me, but she wants me to completly transform nursery environment. I have started to put in areas of learning now and islands rather than heve everything against walls which the children seem to really like. I really need some inspiration as to how to decorate the room, what kinds of things do I put up on walls etc? I have been told to make it very stimulating!

Thanks for any advice, tips etc. :o Christina

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Too stimulating ( as in lots of bright colours and stuff all over the walls ) isn't good from the childrens concentration point of view as it's distracting. In my setting we have gone back to basics - natural colours, lots of wood and baskets etc, noticeboards covered in hessian and calico fabric so as not to detract from the work on them,neutral rugs on the floor, wooden units with baskets for storage rather than all those plastic boxes. We also have very few pictures up on the walls , just the display boards - and as per Communication Friendly Spaces lots of areas where children can gather and chat. It looks much better, more streamlined and calm and it seems to be working well , even the parents noticed and commented how good it all looks . :o

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yep communication friendly spaces - Elizabeth Jarman - says neutral colours and dont overload walls!!!!!! :o

 

here are their considerations :

 

The following key considerations which were identified as contributing to Communication Friendly Spaces (CFS):

 

•The learning environment should support the educational pedagogy of the setting.

•Practitioners should maximise the use of space in all areas, inside and out.

•Spaces should take account of the physical environmental factors that can impact on learning, for example, light, colour and noise.

•The environment should not be over stimulating.

•Spaces should be viewed from the child’s perspective.

 

good luck - have fun xD

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I don't think it's bright that is wrong per se, just too many different colours can be confusing.

 

My advice would be to put displays at children's height, to make them interactive, e.g. with talk buttons, velcro, textures, and to use things like washing lines so they can pin up work easily.

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Thanks for the replies so far, I def think our children do not get stimulation at home so will try and get a balance, just don't know where to start!

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My room is bright and stimulating with photos and childrens work. The walls are blue but we have red blue and yellow shelves bookcorner and drawing area. It is clean and bright and feels homely. Everyone says it has a welcoming atmosphere. I'm sorry but natural colours leave me cold.

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  • 1 month later...

I just watched a Teachers' TV video about the concept of communication-friendly spaces, which is something I haven't really encountered before. It's left me feeling inspired and looking forward to getting into my classroom! I've always assumed that bold, bright colours and lots of whizzy displays should be part and parcel of a standard early years environment, but the CFS idea makes a lot of sense. It encourages educators to make their environments calm and welcoming, and to display children's work prominently without any visual distractions. The video showed a few different classrooms (some of which were very colourful and busy, and others which were simpler and more neutral), and I personally think the rooms inspired by CFS seemed more inviting. I can see why children might find it easier to focus on what they're doing and be more inclined to communicate with their peers in an environment which is less distracting.

 

However, it goes without saying that what works for some children won't necessarily work for them all! Surely it's a case of seeing what works best in different contexts.

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I went on the CFS website following advice from another thread. Trimdon nursery are linked on the site. If you google you'll find their website has wonderful pictures on - FABULOUS!!

 

Just googled and found them, they look so lovely!

 

How much 'stuff' do you have out? We have a lot of our resources available for children to access, but find it just seems to be one big mess, the home corner is trashed, with lots of baby dolls in a heap - how many would you have out? Perhaps when we go back its time to operate 'less is more' and literally set it up like a home to see if they respect it more....

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I visited a school that used the Elizabeth Jarman friendly spaces idea (have heard her speak and she is very good)

 

the thought process went from nursery through to year 6

 

cream walls , display boards of navy blue with cream border and where possible child height

art work displayed straightnot angled, simple uncluttered rooms

real objects displayed and varied according to what each year was studying

role play area in every room, home croner for nursery, reception and year 1 to roman villa in year 6

 

the rooms were peaceful, transition for the children fantastic as each room was similar

 

even the staff room was cream and blue

 

it was a lovely environment back in my packaway we copied the blue and cream on display and notice boards, the display's really stand out we have lots of cosy areas using muslin curtains and cushions and we put less resources out

 

works for us

 

 

we also use leuvern scales to help indentify areas that need improvement or just being left as they are

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well being and involvement is an excellent way of 'looking' at the childrens levels, we use it all the time

and as i said it is also really useful at looking at levels of well being in the areas within the setting

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