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Hi all! I have 2 nursery children who are due to go to school this september and whom I have great concerns about. One child's development has caused me concern for some time and I am so relieved that he has finally been referred to a paediatrician for these concerns to be investigated. Of course this probably will take ages and since it is very difficult to know exactly what the problems are it is tricky to know exactly how to help him. One of his problems is that he finds it very difficult with self help skills, particularly putting his socks on and his hands then begin to shake. I'm sure I have seen somewhere a device that helps with socks? or maybe someone has some suggestions. We have tried modelling it to his, going step by step and still he cannot do this task. I'm sure there are also cognitive issues. Any ideas please????

The other child constantly fidgets, makes faces, fiddles with his face, bounces up and down and recently has started to do things that are unsafe and he gets injured. This is very worrying as I have 26 children in the class so cannot have my eyes totally on him. Maybe I'm worrying too much? Advice would be appreciated. Thanks! :o

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From your descriptions it sounds as if your first child may be suffering with dyspraxia or some form of issue with cognition and co-ordination ( sometimes referred to as clumsy child syndrome) and the second child sounds as if he may have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Hev you spoken to either set of parents about your concerns - or maybe gewt your Ealy Years advisor or Inclusion officer in to do an observation fpr you ? Getting a formal assessment or disgnosis before they stat school will be highly unlikely if your area is anything like ours - it takes ages ! Lots of evidence and observations will be needed, and getting the parents to consider there may be an issue is often the hardest bit but at least it means they can also talk to the GP about thier concerns .

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We wouldn't be able to get anyone in to listen to our concerns about a child without having specific parental permission, and it's a difficult route to travel sometimes.

 

A child we have has ASD, we suspect, and her mother is one of those who really babies her, calling her "'Suzie' pops" (anon) and was very defensive if we approached about anything. I finally took the bull by the horns and suggested that next time they saw the health visitor she should ask when 'Suzie's hearing test was due, as we'd noticed that she didn't seem to be responding. I said I thought that she might have a blocked ear or cold or something, but it would be sensible to get it checked. Luckily she did, and the health visitor realised that there was something else too, she's been referred to our local centre for assessment and that will start the ball rolling. She leaves for school this time, so hopefully the process will be already started for her by then

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Do you have a SENCO available to talk to about your concerns?

 

We have a brilliant one who we can take our concerns to, and she can help us decide the best course of action.

 

We currently have 2 nursery children who have one to one support and another child who support was promised for and now it tunrs out there isn't enough money!

We also have others for whom there are concerns which may or may not be sorted before reception.

I think your SENCO would be an invaluable source here!

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I would agree, get your area Senco in as soon as possible. You also need to be thinking about school transfer and and transition.. if you dont know already can you find out what your LA does to support this transfer for children with particular needs?

 

Obviously as Cait said, you will need parents permission so have a chat with them first about what you would like to do. The systems can whirr incredibly slowly especially if it is felt that a statutory statement is needed, and this can take months.

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With the second child is it possible these could be anxiety or attention behaviours rather than a sign that he has something like ADHD? Has there been a change in his life recently (perhaps one you don't know about?) How does he react when told to stop these behaviours? What happens if you ignore them?

 

The doing unsafe things could just be him deciding that he's going to push things just to see whether or not they are safe or what he is capable of. What sort of things has he been doing? There's a difference between him deciding to climb the climbing frame and swing from one leg to him trying to scale the wall using the shelves as handholds. Okay, these are extreme examples (!!) but I think one shows that he just doesn't understand how to manage risks for himself yet, whilst the other shows more worrying elements.

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