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Orientation Schema


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Hi

Could you please suggest any resources/activities/songs/books that would be useful for a child exploring an orientation schema?

 

 

Thank you

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I needed to check this, too. I have a copy of "Again! Again!" by Featherstone Education.

 

It says that an orientation schema is linked to the positioning and rotation schemas as children experiment with seeing things from different viewpoints. So when children are hanging upside down, or bending over and looking at the world backwards through their legs, hanging by their legs on swings or horizontal bars they may be displaying an orientation schema.

 

The authors say children working through this schema will enjoy building ramps, rocking on chairs or rocking horses, climbing and standing on ledges and slopes or sliding down banisters. Activities they suggest children might like are examining the underneath of objects by turning them upside down, or by getting underneath them to get a better look. Outdoors they suggest providing opportunities to roll, tumble, climb, twist and spin. Other resources include kaleidoscopes, mirrors, magnifying lenses, binoculars, making peep holes and posting boxes. Children may also enjoy pendulums, ropes and tyre swings, playing with tumblemats or doing hand/headstands, rolling over or swinging from low bars, and finding mirrors in unusual places such as on the floor or on the ceiling.

 

Again! Again! is available for approximately £13 from A&C Black - look here for more details.

 

What a fab book!

 

Maz

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Blankets/cushions underneath a table and things stuck to the underneath of the table, even if it's just a piece of paper for them to draw on (good for fine motor skills as well). Could be other stuff though like shapes, mirrors, pictures, words etc.

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I needed to check this, too. I have a copy of "Again! Again!" by Featherstone Education.

 

It says that an orientation schema is linked to the positioning and rotation schemas as children experiment with seeing things from different viewpoints. So when children are hanging upside down, or bending over and looking at the world backwards through their legs, hanging by their legs on swings or horizontal bars they may be displaying an orientation schema.

 

The authors say children working through this schema will enjoy building ramps, rocking on chairs or rocking horses, climbing and standing on ledges and slopes or sliding down banisters. Activities they suggest children might like are examining the underneath of objects by turning them upside down, or by getting underneath them to get a better look. Outdoors they suggest providing opportunities to roll, tumble, climb, twist and spin. Other resources include kaleidoscopes, mirrors, magnifying lenses, binoculars, making peep holes and posting boxes. Children may also enjoy pendulums, ropes and tyre swings, playing with tumblemats or doing hand/headstands, rolling over or swinging from low bars, and finding mirrors in unusual places such as on the floor or on the ceiling.

 

Again! Again! is available for approximately £13 from A&C Black - look here for more details.

 

What a fab book!

 

Maz

 

Thanks for that link Maz - I'm still struggling with schemas and how to folow them through

Edited by carmen
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Thanks ladies!

 

I have become very interested in them, through my EYPS. I have just created a booklet about them for a staff training meeting. Also I have handed out a questionnaire to involve parents too. I read Cathy Nutbrown's Threads of Thinking: Young Children Learning and the Role of Early Education as well as looking up the schema articles on this site. I have been observing the children with this in mind and am now linking planning into children's schemas.

 

Fascinating stuff!

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It is fascinating stuff indeed!

 

Have you finished your booklet/handout? Mind if I have a look?

 

I recently did a short handout as well, but didn't manage to get much feedback on it before my work placement ended.

 

The link is below, if you'd like to offer me some critique :o

http://www.foundation-stage.info/forums/in...showtopic=22663

 

Regards

Mark

http://earlychildcare.wordpress.com

 

Thanks ladies!

 

I have become very interested in them, through my EYPS. I have just created a booklet about them for a staff training meeting. Also I have handed out a questionnaire to involve parents too. I read Cathy Nutbrown's Threads of Thinking: Young Children Learning and the Role of Early Education as well as looking up the schema articles on this site. I have been observing the children with this in mind and am now linking planning into children's schemas.

 

Fascinating stuff!

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  • 3 years later...

i work in a SEN school, the children in reception often have repetitive behaviours, such as one little boy who when outside, will continually drop pebbles into a bucket of water and watch as they sink. is this still a schema ?

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  • 2 months later...

SEN children often get stuck and need support moving through Developmental phases. Their brains do not automatically switch and link ideas due to their conditions..ie with Down syndrome, the dendrites in the brain are not as developed or as many and so linking ideas and creating pathways is more difficult. Also they may be getting sensory feedback which they need. This is not necessarily the same as schemas. Autistic children will repeat actions as they either reject sensory stimulation and replace with another ie hand flapping..or watching turning things..again this is not the same. I may be wrong but as far as I understand schemas differ in that in typically developing children, their body is switching on skills and mastering them...for a time. So they may want so put things into stuff ( enveloping schema) in order to refine ideas of size, shape and object permanence in a different context. while SEN children do this as well, it will be effected by the biology of their condition. I think..!

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