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Transitions - Practitioners Point Of View


danialexis
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I have to make a booklet for practitioners relating to transitions across the foundation stage, my question is , what one piece of information is most important to you in regard to transitions?

 

if anyone has any ideas for parental involvement, current research and legislation, theories, needs of the child i'd be greatful. i've nations of notes but just dont know where to start!

already evaluated how transitions are handled in my setting, this is the second part of the assignment the booklet.

 

why is the first assignment of the year always the hardest!! :o

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Hi danialexis,

 

I think in my mind the most important thing is the individual needs of the child, both in terms of how the transition itself is managed and the importance of communicating information about the child's need to the new setting.

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I always like to start with a definition - Transition- process of change-a process or period in which something undergoes a change and passes from one state, stage, form, or activity to another.

 

How do individual practitioners interpret this word? Does everyone understand it in the same way?

Do they think of internal and external transitions that children experience?

Do they think of the small transitions such us within routines or even between various activities as well as the major ones such as transition into a new setting?

 

I would also conside the implications of assumption, how we as adults perceive the impact of a particular transition may not be how a child perceives it to be. On this note it is important to have open dialogue with the children to really listen to their hopes, fears and expectations.

Really knowing each individual child, their previous experiences will impact on how they manage transitions, for example a looked after child may not form attachments the same as another child, therefore they may not experience a sense of loss when changing keyworker (for example)

 

Good luck with your studies.

 

Peggy

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oooh we did so much on transitions in last module of foundation degree we actually had two assignments on it- one focussing on personal transitions and secong focussing on transition from eyfs to nc...let me dig out my bibliographies...here are a few (the first two are very useful, Hilary Fabian has wrote alot about transitions)

Dunlop, A-W., and Fabian, H. (2002) Transitions in the Early Years, Routledge Farmer, London

Dunlop, A-W., and Fabian, H. (2007) Informing Transitions in the Early Years, McGraw Hill Education, Maidenhead

O’Connor, A. (2007) All About Transitions, DCSF, Nottingham

Ofsted (2005) Early Doors: Experiences for Children in Day Care during the First Hour of the Day

Sanders, D., White, G., Burge, B., Sharp, C., Eames, A., McEune, R., and Grayson, H (2005) A Study of the Transition from the Foundation Stage to Key Stage 1, NFER

 

as both UpsyDaisy and Peggy have stated, the individual needs of the child are paramount and key to a successful transition

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And if you're talking about transitions to school or another setting, it might also be necessary to consider the emotional needs of the children left behind, especially if there is a very deep friendship between the leaver and the remainer!

 

Maz

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